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Incremental to Revolutionary Change: Synthesizing Indian IR System Through the Lens of Punctuated Equilibrium Theory


Affiliations
1 Associate Professor, SCMS, Symbiosis International University, Pune, India
2 Assistant Professor, School of Management and Labor Studies, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai, India
     

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This article examines Indian IR system in the post-COVID-19 scenario through the lens of punctuated equilibrium theory and suggests three possible approaches to cope with the forces and generate and sustain employment growth through increased industrial investment. Theory of punctuated equilibrium advocates that a stable IR structure evolves subtly over a period of time. A swift transformation leads the dismantling of the old system and establishment of a new one. The article provides insights into three themes: first, Indian IR systems present deep structure of punctuated equilibrium, second, why this deep structure is under threat and needs a revolutionary change and third, the way forward to respond to the intrinsic and extrinsic forces.
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  • Incremental to Revolutionary Change: Synthesizing Indian IR System Through the Lens of Punctuated Equilibrium Theory

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Authors

Prashant Mehta
Associate Professor, SCMS, Symbiosis International University, Pune, India
Sunil Budhiraja
Assistant Professor, School of Management and Labor Studies, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai, India

Abstract


This article examines Indian IR system in the post-COVID-19 scenario through the lens of punctuated equilibrium theory and suggests three possible approaches to cope with the forces and generate and sustain employment growth through increased industrial investment. Theory of punctuated equilibrium advocates that a stable IR structure evolves subtly over a period of time. A swift transformation leads the dismantling of the old system and establishment of a new one. The article provides insights into three themes: first, Indian IR systems present deep structure of punctuated equilibrium, second, why this deep structure is under threat and needs a revolutionary change and third, the way forward to respond to the intrinsic and extrinsic forces.

References