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The Relationship between Gender and Clothing


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1 Department of Fashion Design, Faculty of Management, Chandigarh School of Business, Jhanjeri, Mohali, Punjab, India
     

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The relationship between gender and clothing is complex and ever-evolving. For centuries, clothing has been used to signify gender roles in many societies. Clothing styles, colours, and materials have been associated with certain genders, and these associations have changed over time. For example, traditionally, women's clothing was more colourful and decorated, while men's clothing was more utilitarian. Today, both genders are free to express themselves through clothing in ways that were not possible in the past. However, clothing is still often used to signify gender roles, with men's clothing typically being more structured and women's clothing more fluid. Moreover, clothing is also used to convey social status and power, with some clothing items being deemed “appropriate” for certain genders. Ultimately, clothing is a tool to express identity, and the ways in which it is used to signify gender roles and identities can be complex and ever-changing. Religious clothing has been a part of most cultures and societies throughout history. Wearing religious clothing is an outward sign of devotion to a certain faith or belief system. It is also often a symbol of commitment to a certain religious community.

Keywords

gender, clothing, fashion, relation.
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  • The Relationship between Gender and Clothing

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Authors

Atul .
Department of Fashion Design, Faculty of Management, Chandigarh School of Business, Jhanjeri, Mohali, Punjab, India

Abstract


The relationship between gender and clothing is complex and ever-evolving. For centuries, clothing has been used to signify gender roles in many societies. Clothing styles, colours, and materials have been associated with certain genders, and these associations have changed over time. For example, traditionally, women's clothing was more colourful and decorated, while men's clothing was more utilitarian. Today, both genders are free to express themselves through clothing in ways that were not possible in the past. However, clothing is still often used to signify gender roles, with men's clothing typically being more structured and women's clothing more fluid. Moreover, clothing is also used to convey social status and power, with some clothing items being deemed “appropriate” for certain genders. Ultimately, clothing is a tool to express identity, and the ways in which it is used to signify gender roles and identities can be complex and ever-changing. Religious clothing has been a part of most cultures and societies throughout history. Wearing religious clothing is an outward sign of devotion to a certain faith or belief system. It is also often a symbol of commitment to a certain religious community.

Keywords


gender, clothing, fashion, relation.

References