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Decision Making and Demographics:A Study of Academicians in Indian Universities


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1 Mittal School of Business (ACBSP, USA Accredited), Lovely Professional University, Jalandhar, Punjab, India
     

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Decisions are inter-related to the organisational life of a concern. Hence, the leader is committed to decisions not from the time he/she decides, but till such time that they are successfully implemented. The purpose of this paper is to examine the perception of faculty members towards decision making of their academic leaders in the sample select universities. The data collected were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. The data for the study were collected both through the primary and secondary sources. The measuring items used for the study were sourced from existing validated scales and literature. Descriptive statistics was employed to know the descriptive information across various demographic variables on a total sample of 719. The various demographic variables, which were considered for the study, were gender, age, designation and experience. The results revealed that the faculty members of the sample select universities perceived the quality of decision making of their academic leaders at an above-average level; presently, they are fairly satisfied with their academic leader’s decision-making quality. The statistical analysis also revealed a significant effect of gender, age and experience on decision making except designation. It was found that designation has no impact on decision making of leaders. The results obtained from the present study have certain significant implications. Developing leaders’ decision-making competency is paramount in order to increase their leadership behaviour. Besides, academic leaders who are involved in social interaction need decision-making competency to work effectively in a social setting. Therefore, developing the decision-making competencies might help the academic leader to improve work performance, such as maintaining high academic standards in the department/university, quality teaching and research.

Keywords

Decision Making, Academic Leaders, Faculty, Higher Education.
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  • Decision Making and Demographics:A Study of Academicians in Indian Universities

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Authors

Mubashir Majid Baba
Mittal School of Business (ACBSP, USA Accredited), Lovely Professional University, Jalandhar, Punjab, India

Abstract


Decisions are inter-related to the organisational life of a concern. Hence, the leader is committed to decisions not from the time he/she decides, but till such time that they are successfully implemented. The purpose of this paper is to examine the perception of faculty members towards decision making of their academic leaders in the sample select universities. The data collected were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. The data for the study were collected both through the primary and secondary sources. The measuring items used for the study were sourced from existing validated scales and literature. Descriptive statistics was employed to know the descriptive information across various demographic variables on a total sample of 719. The various demographic variables, which were considered for the study, were gender, age, designation and experience. The results revealed that the faculty members of the sample select universities perceived the quality of decision making of their academic leaders at an above-average level; presently, they are fairly satisfied with their academic leader’s decision-making quality. The statistical analysis also revealed a significant effect of gender, age and experience on decision making except designation. It was found that designation has no impact on decision making of leaders. The results obtained from the present study have certain significant implications. Developing leaders’ decision-making competency is paramount in order to increase their leadership behaviour. Besides, academic leaders who are involved in social interaction need decision-making competency to work effectively in a social setting. Therefore, developing the decision-making competencies might help the academic leader to improve work performance, such as maintaining high academic standards in the department/university, quality teaching and research.

Keywords


Decision Making, Academic Leaders, Faculty, Higher Education.

References