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Bioremoval of Copper by Marine Blue Green Algae Phormodium formosum and Oscillatoria simplicissima


Affiliations
1 Marine Biotechnology and Natural Product Extract Laboratory, National Institute of oceanography and Fisheries, Alexandria, Egypt
 

Objectives: Using bio-sorbents is regarded as one of the effective methods to remove heavy metals. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate Cu2+ adsorption and it’s effecting on growth of Phormodium formosum and Oscillatoria simplicissima. Methods/Statistical Analysis: Two marine cyanobacteria isolates P. formosum and O. simplicissima were tested for tolerance and removal of copper supplemental individual as a single metal at different contact times (0, ½, 1½, 3 and 24h), different temperatures (20, 30, 35 and 40 °C), different pH (4, 5, 6, 7, 8) and different concentration (5, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 mg/L) under controlled laboratory conditions. Findings: The obtained results showed that lower concentration of Cu2+ (5, 10 and 20 mg/L) enhanced the algal growth (chlorophyll a), elevated concentration (30, 40 and 50 mg/L) were inhibitory to growth in case of two algal. The bioremoval of heavy metal ions (Cu2+) by P. formosum and O. simplicissima from aqueous solution showed that the highest percentage of metal bioremoval occurred at 24 h of contact time recording 90% and 80% respectively. The maximum biosorption was observed at optimal conditions including 30°C, pH of 7 and 10 mg/L at 24h of contact time. Application/Improvements: The study findings revealed that P. formosumalgae can be effectively in order to adsorb Cu2+ due to its high efficiency of Cu2+ adsorption.
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  • Bioremoval of Copper by Marine Blue Green Algae Phormodium formosum and Oscillatoria simplicissima

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Authors

Reham G. Elkomy
Marine Biotechnology and Natural Product Extract Laboratory, National Institute of oceanography and Fisheries, Alexandria, Egypt
Osama E. M. Rizk
Marine Biotechnology and Natural Product Extract Laboratory, National Institute of oceanography and Fisheries, Alexandria, Egypt

Abstract


Objectives: Using bio-sorbents is regarded as one of the effective methods to remove heavy metals. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate Cu2+ adsorption and it’s effecting on growth of Phormodium formosum and Oscillatoria simplicissima. Methods/Statistical Analysis: Two marine cyanobacteria isolates P. formosum and O. simplicissima were tested for tolerance and removal of copper supplemental individual as a single metal at different contact times (0, ½, 1½, 3 and 24h), different temperatures (20, 30, 35 and 40 °C), different pH (4, 5, 6, 7, 8) and different concentration (5, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 mg/L) under controlled laboratory conditions. Findings: The obtained results showed that lower concentration of Cu2+ (5, 10 and 20 mg/L) enhanced the algal growth (chlorophyll a), elevated concentration (30, 40 and 50 mg/L) were inhibitory to growth in case of two algal. The bioremoval of heavy metal ions (Cu2+) by P. formosum and O. simplicissima from aqueous solution showed that the highest percentage of metal bioremoval occurred at 24 h of contact time recording 90% and 80% respectively. The maximum biosorption was observed at optimal conditions including 30°C, pH of 7 and 10 mg/L at 24h of contact time. Application/Improvements: The study findings revealed that P. formosumalgae can be effectively in order to adsorb Cu2+ due to its high efficiency of Cu2+ adsorption.

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.17485/ijst%2F2019%2Fv12i1%2F134088