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Toward A Conceptual Model of Ethics in Research


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1 1876 Oak Bend Drive Rockwall, Texas 75087, United States
     

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History provides opportunities to look back and evaluate events. Looking back to historical events surrounding research provides the possibility for learning from decisions made and actions taken previously. It is apparent that both good and bad actions were taken during the early years of research. The purpose of this paper was to take a contemporary and historical look into the evolution of ethics in research. This investigation is valuable to higher education because by exploring the events preparations can be made to recognize potential wrongs, avoid or reduce potential wrongs, and determine who is responsible for ethical research. A conceptual model of ethical research is presented. Ethics in research is a shared responsibility. It is dependent on history, the researcher, the reviewers, and the research community. History guides the researcher, the review process, and the research communities.

Keywords

Research Ethics, Research Standards, Research Guidelines, Ethical Review of Research, History of Ethics in Research.
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  • Toward A Conceptual Model of Ethics in Research

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Authors

Gail D. Caruth
1876 Oak Bend Drive Rockwall, Texas 75087, United States

Abstract


History provides opportunities to look back and evaluate events. Looking back to historical events surrounding research provides the possibility for learning from decisions made and actions taken previously. It is apparent that both good and bad actions were taken during the early years of research. The purpose of this paper was to take a contemporary and historical look into the evolution of ethics in research. This investigation is valuable to higher education because by exploring the events preparations can be made to recognize potential wrongs, avoid or reduce potential wrongs, and determine who is responsible for ethical research. A conceptual model of ethical research is presented. Ethics in research is a shared responsibility. It is dependent on history, the researcher, the reviewers, and the research community. History guides the researcher, the review process, and the research communities.

Keywords


Research Ethics, Research Standards, Research Guidelines, Ethical Review of Research, History of Ethics in Research.

References