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Work Engagement and Demographic Factors: A Study among University Teachers


Affiliations
1 Associate Professor, Department of Commerce, Delhi School of Economics, University of Delhi, New Delhi, India
2 Research Scholar, Department of Commerce, Delhi School of Economics, University of Delhi, New Delhi, India
     

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Despite the growing relevance of employee engagement since 1990’s, organizations still struggle to keep the employees engaged. High level of engagement results into multiple enriching effects on organizations. Previous studies have highlighted the significance of both personal and organizational resources in engaging employees. This paper aims to determine the level of work engagement of university teachers in India and to examine whether demographic factors influence work engagement. Demographic factors included gender, age, years of experience, designation, employment status, educational qualification, and marital status. Data collected from 282 university teachers were statistically analyzed. The finding of the study revealed the above-average level of engagement among university teachers. Results showed that the work engagement level differed significantly with age, employment status, designation, and marital status. However, no significant difference in work engagement was found based on gender, educational qualifications, and years of experience. The study contributes to the scant literature on work engagement and its relationship with demographic variables in a non-western setting.

Keywords

Work Engagement, Demographic Factors, Teachers, ANOVA, India.
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  • Work Engagement and Demographic Factors: A Study among University Teachers

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Authors

Urvashi Sharma
Associate Professor, Department of Commerce, Delhi School of Economics, University of Delhi, New Delhi, India
Bhawna Rajput
Research Scholar, Department of Commerce, Delhi School of Economics, University of Delhi, New Delhi, India

Abstract


Despite the growing relevance of employee engagement since 1990’s, organizations still struggle to keep the employees engaged. High level of engagement results into multiple enriching effects on organizations. Previous studies have highlighted the significance of both personal and organizational resources in engaging employees. This paper aims to determine the level of work engagement of university teachers in India and to examine whether demographic factors influence work engagement. Demographic factors included gender, age, years of experience, designation, employment status, educational qualification, and marital status. Data collected from 282 university teachers were statistically analyzed. The finding of the study revealed the above-average level of engagement among university teachers. Results showed that the work engagement level differed significantly with age, employment status, designation, and marital status. However, no significant difference in work engagement was found based on gender, educational qualifications, and years of experience. The study contributes to the scant literature on work engagement and its relationship with demographic variables in a non-western setting.

Keywords


Work Engagement, Demographic Factors, Teachers, ANOVA, India.

References