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Academic Preferences and Achievement: Exploring the Role of Gender Stereotypes and Beliefs


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1 Department of Psychology and Neuroscience College of Psychology, Nova Southeastern University, College Avenue, Fort Lauderdale, FL, United States

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Academic preferences and ensuing scholastic achievement trace their origins to early childhood, particularly school experiences. Extant gender beliefs and stereotypes can potentially influence children's school experiences and eventual academic preferences and decisions. The current literature review explores student academic perceptions and attitudes, academic performance and preference, and developmental changes over the school years, with a particular emphasis on the role of gender based academic stereotypes and gendered representations in academic domains.

Keywords

academic achievement, gender stereotypes
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Abstract Views: 82




  • Academic Preferences and Achievement: Exploring the Role of Gender Stereotypes and Beliefs

Abstract Views: 82  | 

Authors

Sophia M. Franco
Department of Psychology and Neuroscience College of Psychology, Nova Southeastern University, College Avenue, Fort Lauderdale, FL, United States
Madhavi Menon
Department of Psychology and Neuroscience College of Psychology, Nova Southeastern University, College Avenue, Fort Lauderdale, FL, United States

Abstract


Academic preferences and ensuing scholastic achievement trace their origins to early childhood, particularly school experiences. Extant gender beliefs and stereotypes can potentially influence children's school experiences and eventual academic preferences and decisions. The current literature review explores student academic perceptions and attitudes, academic performance and preference, and developmental changes over the school years, with a particular emphasis on the role of gender based academic stereotypes and gendered representations in academic domains.

Keywords


academic achievement, gender stereotypes

References