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Status of Morbidity and Mortality in the State of Odisha, India


Affiliations
1 Rekhi Centre of Excellence for the Science of Happiness, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, West Bengal, India
2 Advanced Technology Development Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, West Bengal, India
3 Department of Applied Geography, Ravenshaw University, Cuttack, Odisha, India
4 Newcastle University, Australia, Oceania, Australia
5 Assistant Teacher, Odisha Adarsha Vidyalaya, Jajpur, Odisha, India
     

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Mortality and morbidity are two crucial components to assess the standard of the health system of a nation. This paper examines the spatial variation in the status of morbidity and mortality in Odisha using three rounds of Annual Health Survey Data conducted from 2010-13. Chronic and acute diseases were used to analyse the status of morbidity whereas crude death rate, infant mortality rate, neonatal, post-neonatal and under-five mortality rates were used to analyse mortality status in the state of Odisha. The composite index depicted the spatial variation in morbidity and mortality across the different districts. Five dimensions were identified through Principal Component analysis which indicated the association between the selected indicators of mortality and morbidity. It was found that the developed districts reported high morbidity and underdeveloped districts reported low morbidity. On the other hand, the underdeveloped districts reported high mortality and developed districts reported low mortality. The results of the study illustrate the importance of the provision of health infrastructures, improvement in education, medical awareness, governmental policies and schemes to improve the overall health status in Odisha.

Keywords

acute illness, chronic illness, morbidity, mortality
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  • Status of Morbidity and Mortality in the State of Odisha, India

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Authors

Ranajit Bera
Rekhi Centre of Excellence for the Science of Happiness, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, West Bengal, India
Rashmi Ranjan Behera
Advanced Technology Development Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, West Bengal, India
Ramya Ranjan Behera
Rekhi Centre of Excellence for the Science of Happiness, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, West Bengal, India
Deepak Panda
Rekhi Centre of Excellence for the Science of Happiness, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, West Bengal, India
Munmun Mohapatra
Rekhi Centre of Excellence for the Science of Happiness, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, West Bengal, India
Sribas Patra
Department of Applied Geography, Ravenshaw University, Cuttack, Odisha, India
Nishikanta Kumar
Newcastle University, Australia, Oceania, Australia
R. Karthik
Advanced Technology Development Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, West Bengal, India
Diganta Panda
Rekhi Centre of Excellence for the Science of Happiness, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, West Bengal, India
Diptimayee Naik
Assistant Teacher, Odisha Adarsha Vidyalaya, Jajpur, Odisha, India

Abstract


Mortality and morbidity are two crucial components to assess the standard of the health system of a nation. This paper examines the spatial variation in the status of morbidity and mortality in Odisha using three rounds of Annual Health Survey Data conducted from 2010-13. Chronic and acute diseases were used to analyse the status of morbidity whereas crude death rate, infant mortality rate, neonatal, post-neonatal and under-five mortality rates were used to analyse mortality status in the state of Odisha. The composite index depicted the spatial variation in morbidity and mortality across the different districts. Five dimensions were identified through Principal Component analysis which indicated the association between the selected indicators of mortality and morbidity. It was found that the developed districts reported high morbidity and underdeveloped districts reported low morbidity. On the other hand, the underdeveloped districts reported high mortality and developed districts reported low mortality. The results of the study illustrate the importance of the provision of health infrastructures, improvement in education, medical awareness, governmental policies and schemes to improve the overall health status in Odisha.

Keywords


acute illness, chronic illness, morbidity, mortality

References