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Youth Power: Creative Challenges and Opportunities


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1 Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology St. John's College, Agra, Uttar Pradesh, India
     

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The youth is the temperament of the society. This great task of major shakeup and change in the mind and outlook of men has to be entrusted to the youth who are the most powerful force in this world. India has the largest youth population in the world today. It is possible that this demographic advantage could turn into our single greatest disadvantage, if the youth of India are not included in, and harnessed to the process of development. Challenges in it are the opportunities for youth, if they learn to cope with the social challenges. The imperative need for a great creative effort born out of devotion of intelligent and laborious hours of youth has become inevitable and necessary. The youth have to rise to the occasion and build creative effort to meet the challenges before them. Participation and active involvement of the youth has a fire of enthusiasm and a social objective is a must for the successful implementation of social and economic policies and programs of the nation, particularly in the area of social welfare, child welfare, suppressed and depressed classes welfare, solving the problems of physically and mentally handicapped and economically backward people without which social change and development in the human society will be imperfect and incomplete.

Keywords

youth power, challenges, opportunities
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  • Youth Power: Creative Challenges and Opportunities

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Authors

Preeti P. Masih
Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology St. John's College, Agra, Uttar Pradesh, India

Abstract


The youth is the temperament of the society. This great task of major shakeup and change in the mind and outlook of men has to be entrusted to the youth who are the most powerful force in this world. India has the largest youth population in the world today. It is possible that this demographic advantage could turn into our single greatest disadvantage, if the youth of India are not included in, and harnessed to the process of development. Challenges in it are the opportunities for youth, if they learn to cope with the social challenges. The imperative need for a great creative effort born out of devotion of intelligent and laborious hours of youth has become inevitable and necessary. The youth have to rise to the occasion and build creative effort to meet the challenges before them. Participation and active involvement of the youth has a fire of enthusiasm and a social objective is a must for the successful implementation of social and economic policies and programs of the nation, particularly in the area of social welfare, child welfare, suppressed and depressed classes welfare, solving the problems of physically and mentally handicapped and economically backward people without which social change and development in the human society will be imperfect and incomplete.

Keywords


youth power, challenges, opportunities

References