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Entrepreneurs in White-Collar Crime:A Convenience Perspective


Affiliations
1 Department of Leadership and Organizational Behavior, BI Norwegian Business School, Oslo, Norway
 

White-collar crime can be a convenient alternative for privileged individuals who want to enrich themselves. Their occupational positions enable them to commit and conceal offenses among legal activities. This is especially the case, when the offender has sole responsibility for entrepreneurial tasks that involve substantial amounts of money, as illustrated by the four executives presented in this article. One simple learning point from this article is that nobody – including chair persons, chief executives, and presidents – should ever have sole responsibility for tasks involving money on behalf of the organization.

Keywords

Deviant Behavior, Organizational Opportunity, White-collar Crime, Convenience Theory, Agency Theory.
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  • Entrepreneurs in White-Collar Crime:A Convenience Perspective

Abstract Views: 85  |  PDF Views: 19

Authors

Petter Gottschalk
Department of Leadership and Organizational Behavior, BI Norwegian Business School, Oslo, Norway

Abstract


White-collar crime can be a convenient alternative for privileged individuals who want to enrich themselves. Their occupational positions enable them to commit and conceal offenses among legal activities. This is especially the case, when the offender has sole responsibility for entrepreneurial tasks that involve substantial amounts of money, as illustrated by the four executives presented in this article. One simple learning point from this article is that nobody – including chair persons, chief executives, and presidents – should ever have sole responsibility for tasks involving money on behalf of the organization.

Keywords


Deviant Behavior, Organizational Opportunity, White-collar Crime, Convenience Theory, Agency Theory.

References





DOI: https://doi.org/10.15759/ijek%2F2017%2Fv5i2%2F190296