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Reproductive Health Status of Rural Unmarried Girls in Chengalpattu District, Tamil Nadu


Affiliations
1 Executive Director, Rural Women Social Education Centre (RUWSEC), Tirukazhukundram – 603109, Chengalpattu District, Tamil Nadu, India
 

The research primarily assesses the reproductive health status of poor unmarried girls in rural Tamil Nadu. The study covered 25 villages which comes under 12 panchayat villages in Thirukazhukundrum block of Chengalpattu District. There were 1062 unmarried girls who attained menarche in the villages. Almost all except 48 girls were Hindus. About 46% were SC/STs and another 40% belonged to most backward castes. The mean and median ages of the girls’ were 18.59 and 18 years respectively. In terms of body mass index, nearly about three fifths of the participants had normal and healthy weight. The prevalence of underweight was 30%. The prevalence of reproductive morbidity was 27% during the reference period of three months prior to the date of survey. While looking into the nature of the morbidities reported we observed that menstrual problems were highly mentioned. The results of multivariate regression analysis indicates that while comparing with those aged over 25 years, adolescent girls were 3.3 times higher chances of having reproductive illness. Similarly the odds of having reproductive illness amplified with increasing body weight, as compared those having low BMI; girls who are obese were 1.27 times more likely to have reproductive illness. Based on the findings it is concluded that imparting knowledge about reproductive physiology and fitness, personal hygiene would empower young girls and make them free from reproductive morbidity.

Keywords

Body Mass Index, Dysmenorrhea, Household Standard of Living, Reproductive Morbidity.
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  • Reproductive Health Status of Rural Unmarried Girls in Chengalpattu District, Tamil Nadu

Abstract Views: 238  |  PDF Views: 196

Authors

P. Balasubramanian
Executive Director, Rural Women Social Education Centre (RUWSEC), Tirukazhukundram – 603109, Chengalpattu District, Tamil Nadu, India

Abstract


The research primarily assesses the reproductive health status of poor unmarried girls in rural Tamil Nadu. The study covered 25 villages which comes under 12 panchayat villages in Thirukazhukundrum block of Chengalpattu District. There were 1062 unmarried girls who attained menarche in the villages. Almost all except 48 girls were Hindus. About 46% were SC/STs and another 40% belonged to most backward castes. The mean and median ages of the girls’ were 18.59 and 18 years respectively. In terms of body mass index, nearly about three fifths of the participants had normal and healthy weight. The prevalence of underweight was 30%. The prevalence of reproductive morbidity was 27% during the reference period of three months prior to the date of survey. While looking into the nature of the morbidities reported we observed that menstrual problems were highly mentioned. The results of multivariate regression analysis indicates that while comparing with those aged over 25 years, adolescent girls were 3.3 times higher chances of having reproductive illness. Similarly the odds of having reproductive illness amplified with increasing body weight, as compared those having low BMI; girls who are obese were 1.27 times more likely to have reproductive illness. Based on the findings it is concluded that imparting knowledge about reproductive physiology and fitness, personal hygiene would empower young girls and make them free from reproductive morbidity.

Keywords


Body Mass Index, Dysmenorrhea, Household Standard of Living, Reproductive Morbidity.

References





DOI: https://doi.org/10.15613/hijrh%2F2019%2Fv6i2%2F190583