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Understanding Gender Identity at Workplace for Professional Occupations


Affiliations
1 Department of Commerce, Delhi School of Economics, University of Delhi, India
 

The paper studies the concept of gender identity at work through certain attributes in professional occupations. These attributes are rated by the respondents as characteristics for professional men, professional women and if those attributes are required to be successful in the profession. It tries to understand if men and women are rated similarly or differently on those traits and if there is some identity gap or presence of certain stereotypical attitudes in the professions. It is important to understand these through hypothesis testing as there is still some biasness and association of stereotypical behaviour which ultimately affect the diversity in the organisation. The statistical analysis reveals that not all attributes are viewed as similar for men and women. It also identifies some attributes particularly significant for professional men and women. There is no clear evidence of stereotypical behaviour in the professions under study. However, the results cannot be generalised because of some limitations.

Keywords

Identity, Identity Formation, Gender Stereotyping, Social Construction.
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  • Understanding Gender Identity at Workplace for Professional Occupations

Abstract Views: 231  |  PDF Views: 78

Authors

Urvashi Sharma
Department of Commerce, Delhi School of Economics, University of Delhi, India

Abstract


The paper studies the concept of gender identity at work through certain attributes in professional occupations. These attributes are rated by the respondents as characteristics for professional men, professional women and if those attributes are required to be successful in the profession. It tries to understand if men and women are rated similarly or differently on those traits and if there is some identity gap or presence of certain stereotypical attitudes in the professions. It is important to understand these through hypothesis testing as there is still some biasness and association of stereotypical behaviour which ultimately affect the diversity in the organisation. The statistical analysis reveals that not all attributes are viewed as similar for men and women. It also identifies some attributes particularly significant for professional men and women. There is no clear evidence of stereotypical behaviour in the professions under study. However, the results cannot be generalised because of some limitations.

Keywords


Identity, Identity Formation, Gender Stereotyping, Social Construction.

References