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Pathology and Polymerase Chain Reaction Detection of Ovine Progressive Pneumonia (Maedi) Cases in Slaughtered Sheep in India


Affiliations
1 Division of Pathology, ICAR-Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Bareilly, Izatnagar-243122, Uttar Pradesh, India
2 Division of Veterinary Public Health, ICAR-Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Bareilly, Izatnagar-243122, Uttar Pradesh, India
3 Division of Pathology, Centre for Animal Disease Research and Diagnosis, ICAR-Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Bareilly, Izatnagar-243122, Uttar Pradesh, India
 

Aim: The small ruminant lentiviruses are known to cause maedi-visna (MV) and caprine arthritis-encephalitis in sheep and goats, typically affecting joints, udder, lungs, and the central nervous system. The diagnosis usually involves serology, clinical signs, immunohistochemistry, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In the present study, the histopathologically positive pneumonia cases of MV were confirmed by PCR in lung tissue probably for the first time in India.
Materials and Methods: A total of 888 lungs of adult sheep, aged between 2 and 5 years, were screened during slaughter, of which 121 were found to have pneumonic lesions. The tissues from each pneumonic lung including associated lymph nodes were collected in 10% neutral buffered formalin for histopathology. The frozen tissues of the same were also collected and stored at -20°C for PCR confirmation.
Results: Three of 121 cases of pneumonic lungs of sheep revealed gross and histopathological lesions suggestive of maedi or ovine progressive pneumonia infection. These 3 cases were further confirmed by PCR technique that amplified 291-base pair DNA in the long terminal repeat sequence of MV provirus.
Conclusion: This study suggests the low occurrence of MV virus (MVV) infection in India in naturally affected sheep based on pathomorphological lesions and using the molecular tool of PCR detection of the virus in tissues. Further, a combination of pathomorphology or/and PCR testing might be optimal for detecting the animals infected with MVV.

Keywords

Histopathology, Maedi-Visna, Ovine Progressive Pneumonia, Polymerase Chain Reaction, Small Ruminant Lentiviruses.
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  • Pathology and Polymerase Chain Reaction Detection of Ovine Progressive Pneumonia (Maedi) Cases in Slaughtered Sheep in India

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Authors

Rahul Singh
Division of Pathology, ICAR-Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Bareilly, Izatnagar-243122, Uttar Pradesh, India
Pawan Kumar
Division of Pathology, ICAR-Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Bareilly, Izatnagar-243122, Uttar Pradesh, India
Rajendra Singh
Division of Pathology, ICAR-Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Bareilly, Izatnagar-243122, Uttar Pradesh, India
Kuldeep Dhama
Division of Pathology, ICAR-Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Bareilly, Izatnagar-243122, Uttar Pradesh, India
Swati Kumari
Division of Pathology, ICAR-Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Bareilly, Izatnagar-243122, Uttar Pradesh, India
Jay Prakash Yadav
Division of Veterinary Public Health, ICAR-Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Bareilly, Izatnagar-243122, Uttar Pradesh, India
Gayatri Kashyap
Division of Pathology, ICAR-Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Bareilly, Izatnagar-243122, Uttar Pradesh, India
Karam Pal Singh
Division of Pathology, Centre for Animal Disease Research and Diagnosis, ICAR-Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Bareilly, Izatnagar-243122, Uttar Pradesh, India
Vidya Singh
Division of Pathology, ICAR-Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Bareilly, Izatnagar-243122, Uttar Pradesh, India
Monalisa Sahoo
Division of Pathology, ICAR-Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Bareilly, Izatnagar-243122, Uttar Pradesh, India

Abstract


Aim: The small ruminant lentiviruses are known to cause maedi-visna (MV) and caprine arthritis-encephalitis in sheep and goats, typically affecting joints, udder, lungs, and the central nervous system. The diagnosis usually involves serology, clinical signs, immunohistochemistry, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In the present study, the histopathologically positive pneumonia cases of MV were confirmed by PCR in lung tissue probably for the first time in India.
Materials and Methods: A total of 888 lungs of adult sheep, aged between 2 and 5 years, were screened during slaughter, of which 121 were found to have pneumonic lesions. The tissues from each pneumonic lung including associated lymph nodes were collected in 10% neutral buffered formalin for histopathology. The frozen tissues of the same were also collected and stored at -20°C for PCR confirmation.
Results: Three of 121 cases of pneumonic lungs of sheep revealed gross and histopathological lesions suggestive of maedi or ovine progressive pneumonia infection. These 3 cases were further confirmed by PCR technique that amplified 291-base pair DNA in the long terminal repeat sequence of MV provirus.
Conclusion: This study suggests the low occurrence of MV virus (MVV) infection in India in naturally affected sheep based on pathomorphological lesions and using the molecular tool of PCR detection of the virus in tissues. Further, a combination of pathomorphology or/and PCR testing might be optimal for detecting the animals infected with MVV.

Keywords


Histopathology, Maedi-Visna, Ovine Progressive Pneumonia, Polymerase Chain Reaction, Small Ruminant Lentiviruses.