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19th Century Kashmir Valley Under Lahore Darbar a Thorough Analysis


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1 Deptt. of History, Postgraduate Govt. College for Girls, Sector 42, Chandigarh-160036, India
 

The history of Kashmir is greatly influenced by its geography. The valley appears a little world of its own which in the past assured her a distinct geographical, historical and cultural existence. The Afghan rule, prior to Lahore Darbar’s conquest and administration, proved to be the cruelest for Kashmiris. They, despite religious affinity, felt constrained to throw off the Pathan yoke. Fortunately the then policy of Maharaja Ranjit Singh’s territorial expansion proved a surprise boon on Valley’s conquest and annexation by Lahore Darbar in 1819. Ranjit Singh Administered Kashmir through Nazims (Governors) and Revenue Farmers. A significant development in respect of agriculture and industry took place. Though, still in the middle ages, seeds of tourism in the Valley started appearing. Reforms on socio-economic and religious fronts were visible. Government grants were extended to Hindu and Muslim shrines unbiasedly. Lahore Darbar provided huge financial help and allied facilities to the valley during natural calamities after 1828 and especially the horrible famine of 1833 which shattered Kashmir economy. The Kashmiris greatly welcomed the rule of Ranjit Singh as it freed them from the chain of slavery in addition to putting a complete halt to ‘wealth Drain’. Lahore Darbar brought, on the whole, mental and financial relief to the natives. Indeed, under the secular and benevolent despotic Lahore Darbar rule, their prospectus appeared quite positive, satisfying and encouraging.

Keywords

Geographical Influence, Decline of Afghans, Slavery, Ranjit Singh, Lahore Darbar, Birbal Dhar, Administration, Natural Calamity, Benevolence, Development.
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  • 19th Century Kashmir Valley Under Lahore Darbar a Thorough Analysis

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Authors

Harmeet Sethi
Deptt. of History, Postgraduate Govt. College for Girls, Sector 42, Chandigarh-160036, India

Abstract


The history of Kashmir is greatly influenced by its geography. The valley appears a little world of its own which in the past assured her a distinct geographical, historical and cultural existence. The Afghan rule, prior to Lahore Darbar’s conquest and administration, proved to be the cruelest for Kashmiris. They, despite religious affinity, felt constrained to throw off the Pathan yoke. Fortunately the then policy of Maharaja Ranjit Singh’s territorial expansion proved a surprise boon on Valley’s conquest and annexation by Lahore Darbar in 1819. Ranjit Singh Administered Kashmir through Nazims (Governors) and Revenue Farmers. A significant development in respect of agriculture and industry took place. Though, still in the middle ages, seeds of tourism in the Valley started appearing. Reforms on socio-economic and religious fronts were visible. Government grants were extended to Hindu and Muslim shrines unbiasedly. Lahore Darbar provided huge financial help and allied facilities to the valley during natural calamities after 1828 and especially the horrible famine of 1833 which shattered Kashmir economy. The Kashmiris greatly welcomed the rule of Ranjit Singh as it freed them from the chain of slavery in addition to putting a complete halt to ‘wealth Drain’. Lahore Darbar brought, on the whole, mental and financial relief to the natives. Indeed, under the secular and benevolent despotic Lahore Darbar rule, their prospectus appeared quite positive, satisfying and encouraging.

Keywords


Geographical Influence, Decline of Afghans, Slavery, Ranjit Singh, Lahore Darbar, Birbal Dhar, Administration, Natural Calamity, Benevolence, Development.

References