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Manuring Needs of Tea (Camellia sinensis) in Southern India


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1 ICAR-Indian Institute of soil and Water conservation, Research Centre, Udhagamandalam (T.N.), India
     

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Tea (Camellia sinensis) is an important plantation crop. India has 5,63,980 ha land under tea of which 1,05,685 ha is in Southern India. In India states like Assam (53%), West Bengal (23.9%), Tamil Nadu (11.3%) and Kerala (8.44%) are contributing for major tea production. It is also grown in a small scale in Tripura, Karnataka, Himachal Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh, Sikkim, Bihar, Manipur, Orissa, Nagaland and Arunachal Pradesh. Tea industry in India is more than 150 years old generating the revenue of more than Rs 6,000 crore per annum. The production of tea in India has increased from 250 million kg in 1947 to 1208 million kg in 2013 with 40 per cent increase in area. Optimum application of nutrients in right time ensures optimum tea yield.
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  • Manuring Needs of Tea (Camellia sinensis) in Southern India

Abstract Views: 94  |  PDF Views: 0

Authors

D. Dinesh
ICAR-Indian Institute of soil and Water conservation, Research Centre, Udhagamandalam (T.N.), India
K. Rajan
ICAR-Indian Institute of soil and Water conservation, Research Centre, Udhagamandalam (T.N.), India
V. Kasthuri Thilagam
ICAR-Indian Institute of soil and Water conservation, Research Centre, Udhagamandalam (T.N.), India
O. P. S. Khola
ICAR-Indian Institute of soil and Water conservation, Research Centre, Udhagamandalam (T.N.), India

Abstract


Tea (Camellia sinensis) is an important plantation crop. India has 5,63,980 ha land under tea of which 1,05,685 ha is in Southern India. In India states like Assam (53%), West Bengal (23.9%), Tamil Nadu (11.3%) and Kerala (8.44%) are contributing for major tea production. It is also grown in a small scale in Tripura, Karnataka, Himachal Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh, Sikkim, Bihar, Manipur, Orissa, Nagaland and Arunachal Pradesh. Tea industry in India is more than 150 years old generating the revenue of more than Rs 6,000 crore per annum. The production of tea in India has increased from 250 million kg in 1947 to 1208 million kg in 2013 with 40 per cent increase in area. Optimum application of nutrients in right time ensures optimum tea yield.