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Examining the Psychometrics of the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC) among Medical Staff Members at the Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Egypt


Affiliations
1 Department of Medical Education, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt
 

Objectives: This study aims to investigate the level of Career Resilience among Medical Staff members and examine the psychometrics of the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC). Subjects and Methods: This is a descriptive, cross-sectional study; the study population included medical staff from basic and clinical departments at the Faculty Of Medicine, Suez Canal University (FOM-SCU) (n=75). The instrument was Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC) to assess medical staffs’ career resilience. Results: This study reveals that the medical staff at FOM-SCU agreed that things happen for a reason, past success gives them confidence for new challenge and, sometimes fate or God can help (78%, 72% and 72%, respectively). Ninety two percent of participants had a resilience score of ?50%. Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) of the CD-RISC was conducted. This analysis yielded four factors. These factors were labeled as follows: Factor 1: Personal Competence, Factor 2: Tolerance of Negative Affect; Factor 3: Acceptance of change, secure relationships, and spiritual influences; and Factor 4: Control. Conclusion: The findings revealed that the medical staff received a high level of career resilience, and they especially felt that God gives them confidence. Resilience reveals how the medical staff copes with change and how they face challenges and risk events in the health profession. This study assessed the psychometric properties of the CD-RISC questionnaire and concluded that it is a reliable and valid instrument to measure career resilience in medical staff.


Keywords

Acceptance of Change, Personal Competence, Resilience, Reliability, Secure Relationships, Spiritual Influences, Validity.
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  • Examining the Psychometrics of the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC) among Medical Staff Members at the Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Egypt

Abstract Views: 109  |  PDF Views: 39

Authors

Enas Gouda
Department of Medical Education, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt
Doaa Kamal
Department of Medical Education, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt
Sally Fouad
Department of Medical Education, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt
Shimaa Elaraby
Department of Medical Education, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt

Abstract


Objectives: This study aims to investigate the level of Career Resilience among Medical Staff members and examine the psychometrics of the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC). Subjects and Methods: This is a descriptive, cross-sectional study; the study population included medical staff from basic and clinical departments at the Faculty Of Medicine, Suez Canal University (FOM-SCU) (n=75). The instrument was Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC) to assess medical staffs’ career resilience. Results: This study reveals that the medical staff at FOM-SCU agreed that things happen for a reason, past success gives them confidence for new challenge and, sometimes fate or God can help (78%, 72% and 72%, respectively). Ninety two percent of participants had a resilience score of ?50%. Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) of the CD-RISC was conducted. This analysis yielded four factors. These factors were labeled as follows: Factor 1: Personal Competence, Factor 2: Tolerance of Negative Affect; Factor 3: Acceptance of change, secure relationships, and spiritual influences; and Factor 4: Control. Conclusion: The findings revealed that the medical staff received a high level of career resilience, and they especially felt that God gives them confidence. Resilience reveals how the medical staff copes with change and how they face challenges and risk events in the health profession. This study assessed the psychometric properties of the CD-RISC questionnaire and concluded that it is a reliable and valid instrument to measure career resilience in medical staff.


Keywords


Acceptance of Change, Personal Competence, Resilience, Reliability, Secure Relationships, Spiritual Influences, Validity.

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.18311/jeoh%2F2022%2F28805