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Ezekiel's New Perspective for Women


Affiliations
1 Department of English, J.V. College, Baraut, Bagpat (U.P.), India
2 Department of Humanities Dept., Pratap Institute of Technology & Science, Akhaipura, Palsana, Distt-Sikar, Rajastan, India
     

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The women have been a focal subject in world literature from the earliest fumbling literary efforts of men, and have also been long conventionally accepted as an ideal homemaker as a dutiful wife, a loving mother and a caring daughter who keeps her birth in her parents' house and it is believed that her corpse would go from her 'Sasural' (in law's house). Indian literature has been quite generous in giving esteemed place to women. The world's two greatest epics The Ramayana and The Mahabharata written by Rishi Valmiki and Rishi Ved Vyas, respectively, revolved around women being the central characters in the forms of Sita and Draupadi.It is equally true of India where the ancient religions, spiritual Vedic treatises and the Upnishadas abound in references extolling her role and status in the society that the gods live there where women are worshipped. 1It is an ultimate admiration of women heard everywhere in the world.But in actual sense we worship the lady who as a child, lives:

Keywords

Sasural, Body, Other, Sex Object, Feminist Discourse, Environment, Wedding Prostitute, Women, Mother, God, Manusmiriti.
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  • Ezekiel's New Perspective for Women

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Authors

Ram Sharma
Department of English, J.V. College, Baraut, Bagpat (U.P.), India
Anshu Sharma
Department of Humanities Dept., Pratap Institute of Technology & Science, Akhaipura, Palsana, Distt-Sikar, Rajastan, India

Abstract


The women have been a focal subject in world literature from the earliest fumbling literary efforts of men, and have also been long conventionally accepted as an ideal homemaker as a dutiful wife, a loving mother and a caring daughter who keeps her birth in her parents' house and it is believed that her corpse would go from her 'Sasural' (in law's house). Indian literature has been quite generous in giving esteemed place to women. The world's two greatest epics The Ramayana and The Mahabharata written by Rishi Valmiki and Rishi Ved Vyas, respectively, revolved around women being the central characters in the forms of Sita and Draupadi.It is equally true of India where the ancient religions, spiritual Vedic treatises and the Upnishadas abound in references extolling her role and status in the society that the gods live there where women are worshipped. 1It is an ultimate admiration of women heard everywhere in the world.But in actual sense we worship the lady who as a child, lives:

Keywords


Sasural, Body, Other, Sex Object, Feminist Discourse, Environment, Wedding Prostitute, Women, Mother, God, Manusmiriti.

References