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Effect of Modified Atmosphere Packaging on Storage Life and Quality of Cherry Tomato


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1 Department of Processing and Food Engineering, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana (Punjab), India
     

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Freshly harvest tomato after washing with water packaged in LDPE packages of various thicknesses viz., 25, 37.5 and 50μm and 0, 4 and 8 perforations of 1.0 mm diameter each and a separate sample was taken for comparison under ambient storage conditions (31.2±2°C and 74.5±3% RH) with a view to improve the storage life and quality. Packaged fruit were assessed for Gas concentrations (O2 and CO2) and quality parameters such as PLW, colour, firmness, lycopene content, TSS, titrable acidity and sensory evaluation. Results obtained were analyzed statistically with the help of ANOVA and DMRT (α = 0.05). Higher O2 concentration (16.10%), lower CO2 evolute (7.41%) was observed in 37.5 μm packaging with 8 perforations. Lower PLW was observed to be 3.78 per cent and 3.97 per cent of initial weight in non-perforated 25μm and 37.5μm, respectively. TCD was observed to lowest (8.10) and firmess better retained by 37.5μm with 8 perforation. Among all the treatments, 37.5μm LDPE packages with 8 perforations were found to be the best package and cherry tomato could be stored for upto 2 weeks under low temperature storage conditions.

Keywords

Cherry Tomato, Modified Atmosphere Packaging, Total Colour Difference (TCD), Physiological Loss Weight (PLW), Sensory Evaluation.
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  • Effect of Modified Atmosphere Packaging on Storage Life and Quality of Cherry Tomato

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Authors

Rohit Narang
Department of Processing and Food Engineering, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana (Punjab), India
Ankit Kumar
Department of Processing and Food Engineering, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana (Punjab), India
S. R. Sharma
Department of Processing and Food Engineering, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana (Punjab), India

Abstract


Freshly harvest tomato after washing with water packaged in LDPE packages of various thicknesses viz., 25, 37.5 and 50μm and 0, 4 and 8 perforations of 1.0 mm diameter each and a separate sample was taken for comparison under ambient storage conditions (31.2±2°C and 74.5±3% RH) with a view to improve the storage life and quality. Packaged fruit were assessed for Gas concentrations (O2 and CO2) and quality parameters such as PLW, colour, firmness, lycopene content, TSS, titrable acidity and sensory evaluation. Results obtained were analyzed statistically with the help of ANOVA and DMRT (α = 0.05). Higher O2 concentration (16.10%), lower CO2 evolute (7.41%) was observed in 37.5 μm packaging with 8 perforations. Lower PLW was observed to be 3.78 per cent and 3.97 per cent of initial weight in non-perforated 25μm and 37.5μm, respectively. TCD was observed to lowest (8.10) and firmess better retained by 37.5μm with 8 perforation. Among all the treatments, 37.5μm LDPE packages with 8 perforations were found to be the best package and cherry tomato could be stored for upto 2 weeks under low temperature storage conditions.

Keywords


Cherry Tomato, Modified Atmosphere Packaging, Total Colour Difference (TCD), Physiological Loss Weight (PLW), Sensory Evaluation.

References