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Role of IoT and AI in Welding Industry 4.0


Affiliations
1 G.S.Mandal's Maharashtra Institute of Technology,Aurangabad - 431010, Maharashtra State, India
2 Centre for Materials Joining and Research (CEMAJOR), Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Annamalai University Annamalai Nagar - 608002, Tamil Nadu State, India
3 Department of Computer Science and Applications, Hinduja College of Commerce Mumbai 400004, Maharashtra State, India
     

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The IoT (Internet of Thing) basically pertains to the concept of linking anything that is powered both to the internet and each other and simulating human intelligence by machines, particularly computer systems is artificial intelligence. It includes learning (acquisition of data and rules for exploiting the data), logic (exploiting rules to arrive at probable or definitive findings) and selfrectification. Many automatic welding machines are now connected to a computer and are fully networked and can be reached anywhere in world from a computer at any time. The first apparent use would be in the evaluation and configuration of the equipment itself, as the equipment must be regularly interfaced with a network to perform these functions. Future IoT technology for the welding sector is likely to emerge largely as part of an artificial intelligence network, as it would be extremely beneficial to control and monitor functions even though the system is not in connection with internet. Simulating human intelligence by machines, specifically computers is known as Artificial intelligence (AI). It includes learning (acquisition of data and rules for exploiting the data), logic (exploiting rules to arrive at probable or definitive findings) and self-rectification. AI is incorporated into a variety of different types of technology. AI will have IoT flexibility which would play a major role in complying the requirements of Welding Industry 4.0.
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  • Role of IoT and AI in Welding Industry 4.0

Abstract Views: 96  |  PDF Views: 2

Authors

Tushar Sonar
G.S.Mandal's Maharashtra Institute of Technology,Aurangabad - 431010, Maharashtra State, India
V. Balasubramanian
Centre for Materials Joining and Research (CEMAJOR), Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Annamalai University Annamalai Nagar - 608002, Tamil Nadu State, India
S. Malarvizhi
Centre for Materials Joining and Research (CEMAJOR), Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Annamalai University Annamalai Nagar - 608002, Tamil Nadu State, India
Namita Dusane
Department of Computer Science and Applications, Hinduja College of Commerce Mumbai 400004, Maharashtra State, India

Abstract


The IoT (Internet of Thing) basically pertains to the concept of linking anything that is powered both to the internet and each other and simulating human intelligence by machines, particularly computer systems is artificial intelligence. It includes learning (acquisition of data and rules for exploiting the data), logic (exploiting rules to arrive at probable or definitive findings) and selfrectification. Many automatic welding machines are now connected to a computer and are fully networked and can be reached anywhere in world from a computer at any time. The first apparent use would be in the evaluation and configuration of the equipment itself, as the equipment must be regularly interfaced with a network to perform these functions. Future IoT technology for the welding sector is likely to emerge largely as part of an artificial intelligence network, as it would be extremely beneficial to control and monitor functions even though the system is not in connection with internet. Simulating human intelligence by machines, specifically computers is known as Artificial intelligence (AI). It includes learning (acquisition of data and rules for exploiting the data), logic (exploiting rules to arrive at probable or definitive findings) and self-rectification. AI is incorporated into a variety of different types of technology. AI will have IoT flexibility which would play a major role in complying the requirements of Welding Industry 4.0.

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.22486/iwj.v55i1.211209