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Acculturation Experience of Indian and Nepali Immigrants: A Thematic Analysis


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1 Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology Awadh Law College, Barabanki, Uttar Pradesh, India
     

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This work investigates acculturation experiences of Nepali immigrants residing in India and Indian immigrants residing in Nepal from the Indo-Nepal border areas alongside the eastern Uttar Pradesh border. The sample comprised of a total of 14 families 7 families from each nation. For the present study a semi-structured interview was demeanor to collect data from participants and Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) was taken into consideration. Thematic analysis was done to explore the consequences of migration in immigrants. It was revealed that there was an assortment of problems across different ages faced due to migration such as linguistic barriers, drift between two different worlds and cultures, developing segregation, ethnocentrism; diffuse identity while keeping pace between both cultures. It was found that there was discrepancy in views and opinions among family members in different perspectives after migrating to another country. A heavy burden is placed on the child who must serve as a cultural and linguistic broker while still in the process of being socialized to the culture of the parents as well as of the host culture. Immigrant parents are often involved in their own acculturation but sometimes must rely on their more rapidly acculturating children to assist them with their daily functioning. Thus, the present endeavor attempts to provide an understanding of the processes and difficulties experienced by immigrants across different developmental stages that could prove to be an important aspect of understanding their psychological and behavioral perspectives during adjustment processes and come out of stressors.


Keywords

stress, adjustment, adaptation
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  • Acculturation Experience of Indian and Nepali Immigrants: A Thematic Analysis

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Authors

Radha Maddhesia
Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology Awadh Law College, Barabanki, Uttar Pradesh, India

Abstract


This work investigates acculturation experiences of Nepali immigrants residing in India and Indian immigrants residing in Nepal from the Indo-Nepal border areas alongside the eastern Uttar Pradesh border. The sample comprised of a total of 14 families 7 families from each nation. For the present study a semi-structured interview was demeanor to collect data from participants and Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) was taken into consideration. Thematic analysis was done to explore the consequences of migration in immigrants. It was revealed that there was an assortment of problems across different ages faced due to migration such as linguistic barriers, drift between two different worlds and cultures, developing segregation, ethnocentrism; diffuse identity while keeping pace between both cultures. It was found that there was discrepancy in views and opinions among family members in different perspectives after migrating to another country. A heavy burden is placed on the child who must serve as a cultural and linguistic broker while still in the process of being socialized to the culture of the parents as well as of the host culture. Immigrant parents are often involved in their own acculturation but sometimes must rely on their more rapidly acculturating children to assist them with their daily functioning. Thus, the present endeavor attempts to provide an understanding of the processes and difficulties experienced by immigrants across different developmental stages that could prove to be an important aspect of understanding their psychological and behavioral perspectives during adjustment processes and come out of stressors.


Keywords


stress, adjustment, adaptation

References