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To Gain Insight into the Relationships among Religious Fundamentalism, Ambivalent Sexism, and Gender Role Beliefs in Young Adults


Affiliations
1 Student Researcher, Department of Psychology University of Delhi, Delhi, India
2 Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology Mata Sundri College for Women, University of Delhi, Delhi, India
     

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For thousands of years, religion has been the most powerful and influential belief system that humans have followed. It has an effect on our cognitions, causing us to perceive the world as a place with a deliberate design, or one created by a higher power. The goal of this study was to see the relationship between Religious Fundamentalism, Ambivalent Sexism, and Gender Role Beliefs in Young Adults. A total of 80 students between the ages of 18 and 24 were included in the study. Purposive and snowball sampling were used to select the participants. The questionnaires were distributed to the participants via a Google Form. SPSS was used to perform the t test and correlation analysis. The results revealed that there was no statistically significant difference in religious fundamentalism between male and female participants, but men had a higher mean score than women. The findings also revealed a link between religious fundamentalism, gender role belief, and ambivalent sexism among young adults.

Keywords

religion, religious fundamentalism, ambivalent sexism, gender role beliefs, relationship, young adults
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  • To Gain Insight into the Relationships among Religious Fundamentalism, Ambivalent Sexism, and Gender Role Beliefs in Young Adults

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Authors

Bhumika Pareek
Student Researcher, Department of Psychology University of Delhi, Delhi, India
Dipika S. Dhanda
Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology Mata Sundri College for Women, University of Delhi, Delhi, India

Abstract


For thousands of years, religion has been the most powerful and influential belief system that humans have followed. It has an effect on our cognitions, causing us to perceive the world as a place with a deliberate design, or one created by a higher power. The goal of this study was to see the relationship between Religious Fundamentalism, Ambivalent Sexism, and Gender Role Beliefs in Young Adults. A total of 80 students between the ages of 18 and 24 were included in the study. Purposive and snowball sampling were used to select the participants. The questionnaires were distributed to the participants via a Google Form. SPSS was used to perform the t test and correlation analysis. The results revealed that there was no statistically significant difference in religious fundamentalism between male and female participants, but men had a higher mean score than women. The findings also revealed a link between religious fundamentalism, gender role belief, and ambivalent sexism among young adults.

Keywords


religion, religious fundamentalism, ambivalent sexism, gender role beliefs, relationship, young adults

References