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Mangrove Forests of India


Affiliations
1 Centre of Advanced Study in Marine Biology, Annamalai University, Parangipettai 608 502, India
 

Mangrove forests of India are globally unique with the highest record of biodiversity, gifted with the mangrove genetic paradise at Bhitarkanika, and the globally threatened wildlife species in the Sundarbans. The Sundarbans of India and Bangladesh is the only largest mangrove forest in the world colonized by the Royal Bengal Tigers. Mangroves are dense and floristically diverse along the east coast of India and the Andaman and Nicobar Islands. They are largely distributed in the high energy tidal coast of two extreme conditions: (i) humid and wet in Sundarbans with rich bio-diversity, and (ii) arid and dry in Gujarat with low biodiversity. Despite increasing pressures, the mangrove cover in India increases annually at the rate of 1.2%, as against the global mangrove cover that disappears at 0.66%. However, India has a large track of sparse mangrove stand. This article discusses the present status of mangrove forests, conservation and management strategies being followed successfully in India, and recommends the future directions for mangrove restoration, improvisation of sparse stands, participatory management, and quality publications on mangrove research.

Keywords

Bhitarkanika, Mangrove Forest Ecosystems, Management, Sundarbans.
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  • Mangrove Forests of India

Abstract Views: 483  |  PDF Views: 91

Authors

K. Kathiresan
Centre of Advanced Study in Marine Biology, Annamalai University, Parangipettai 608 502, India

Abstract


Mangrove forests of India are globally unique with the highest record of biodiversity, gifted with the mangrove genetic paradise at Bhitarkanika, and the globally threatened wildlife species in the Sundarbans. The Sundarbans of India and Bangladesh is the only largest mangrove forest in the world colonized by the Royal Bengal Tigers. Mangroves are dense and floristically diverse along the east coast of India and the Andaman and Nicobar Islands. They are largely distributed in the high energy tidal coast of two extreme conditions: (i) humid and wet in Sundarbans with rich bio-diversity, and (ii) arid and dry in Gujarat with low biodiversity. Despite increasing pressures, the mangrove cover in India increases annually at the rate of 1.2%, as against the global mangrove cover that disappears at 0.66%. However, India has a large track of sparse mangrove stand. This article discusses the present status of mangrove forests, conservation and management strategies being followed successfully in India, and recommends the future directions for mangrove restoration, improvisation of sparse stands, participatory management, and quality publications on mangrove research.

Keywords


Bhitarkanika, Mangrove Forest Ecosystems, Management, Sundarbans.

References





DOI: https://doi.org/10.18520/cs%2Fv114%2Fi05%2F976-981