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Disassembling the Software Architecture of Digital Libraries: Getting More Out of the Building Blocks


Affiliations
1 Department of Computer Science, University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand
     

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This article is the second in a series of three publications that reflect on the boundaries and perceptions of what we think of when we hear the term Digital Libraries, with reference to our mainstream digital library systems. In this second article we look at how the existing building blocks of these digital library software architectures can be re-purposed - with only a modest amount of work - to better support interoperability. We do so through two key developments that show what is possible when this thinking is applied to the open source Greenstone software architecture, supported by several examples of it in use. The first key development focuses on the document ingest phase of the digital library, and shows how it can be transformed into an exchange centre for other digital library systems. The second key development builds on top of the ingest developments of the first, and targets interoperability within the runtime system. It demonstrates how a proxying technique can be used to provide a ready-to-use interactive workflow and end-user experience crafted for one digital library architecture (Greenstone), but applies it to another (Fedora).

Keywords

Digital Libraries, Digital Library Architecture, Digital Library Software, FEDORA. Greenstone Digital Library
User
About The Author

David Bainbridge
Department of Computer Science, University of Waikato, Hamilton
New Zealand


Notifications

  • Bainbridge, D., Don, K.J., Buchanan, G.R., Witten, I.H., Jones, S., Jones, M. & Barr, M.I. (2004). Dynamic digital library construction and configuration. Research and Advanced Technology for Digital Libraries, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-30230-8_1.
  • Bainbridge, D. & Cunningham, S.J. (2011). A Workflow for Document Level Interoperability. In: 16th Australasian Document Computing Symposium, RMIT University; p. 31-38.
  • Bainbridge, D., Edgar, K.D., McPherson, J.R., & Witten. I.H. (2003). Managing Change in a Digital Library System with many Interface Languages. In: Traugott Koch and Ingeborg Sølvberg, editors, Research and Advanced Technology for Digital Libraries, 7th European Conference (ECDL), volume 2769 of Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Trondheim, Norway, 2003, Springer; p. 350-61.
  • Bainbridge, D., & Witten. I.H. (2008). A Fedora Librarian Interface. In: Proceedings of the 8th ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Conference on Digital Libraries, ACM; p. 407-416. https://doi.org/10.1145/1378889.1378962.
  • Buchanan, G. (2006). FRBR: Enriching and Integrating Digital Libraries. In: Joint ACM/IEEE Conference on Digital Libraries (review). https://doi.org/10.1145/1141753.1141812.
  • Cundiff, M.V. (2004). An introduction to the Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard (METS). Library Hi Tech, 22(1), 52-64, https://doi.org/10.1108/07378830410524495.
  • Gartner, R. (2003). MODS: Metadata object description schema. JISC. http://www.jisc.ac.uk/uploaded_documents/tsw_03-06.pdf.
  • Ke, K.Y., Witten, I.H. & Bainbridge, D. (2006). Document Level Interoperability for Collection Creators. In: Proceedings of the 6th ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Conference on Digital Libraries (JCDL ‘06), p. 105-06.
  • Lagoze, C., Payette, S., Shin, E. & Wilper, C. (2006). Fedora: An Architecture for Complex Objects and their Relationships. Journal of Digital Libraries, 6(2), 124-38, https://doi.org/10.1007/s00799-005-0130-3.
  • Lagoze, C. & de Sompel, H.V. (2003). The making of the open archives initiative protocol for metadata harvesting. Library Hi Tech, 21(2), 118-28. https://doi.org/10.1108/07378830310479776.
  • NISO. Information Retrieval (Z39.50): Application Service Definition and Protocol Specification. National Information Standards Organization Press; 1996.
  • Smith, M., Bass, M., McClella, G., Tansley, R., Barton, M. Branschofsky, M., Stuve, & Walker, J.H. (2003). DSpace: An open source dynamic digital repository. D-Lib Magazine, 9(1). https://doi.org/10.1045/january2003-smith.
  • Storey, T. (2004). Moving Z39.50 to the web. OCLC Newsletter; p. 263. http://www.oclc.org/news/publications/newsletters/oclc/2004/263/srw.html.
  • Tansley, R. & Harnad, S. (2000). Eprints.org software for creating institutional and individual open archives. D-Lib Magazine, 6(10).
  • Witten, I.H., Bainbridge, D., Tansley, R., Huang, C.Y., & Don, K. (2005). Stone D: A bridge between Greenstone and DSpace. D-Lib Magazine, 11(9). https://doi.org/10.1045/september2005-witten.
  • Witten. I.H., Bainbridge, D., Paynter, G.W. & Boddie, S. (2002). The Greenstone Plugin Architecture. In: Proceedings of the Second ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Conference on Digital Libraries, ACM Press; p. 285-86. https://doi.org/10.1145/544220.544285.

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  • Disassembling the Software Architecture of Digital Libraries: Getting More Out of the Building Blocks

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Authors

David Bainbridge
Department of Computer Science, University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand

Abstract


This article is the second in a series of three publications that reflect on the boundaries and perceptions of what we think of when we hear the term Digital Libraries, with reference to our mainstream digital library systems. In this second article we look at how the existing building blocks of these digital library software architectures can be re-purposed - with only a modest amount of work - to better support interoperability. We do so through two key developments that show what is possible when this thinking is applied to the open source Greenstone software architecture, supported by several examples of it in use. The first key development focuses on the document ingest phase of the digital library, and shows how it can be transformed into an exchange centre for other digital library systems. The second key development builds on top of the ingest developments of the first, and targets interoperability within the runtime system. It demonstrates how a proxying technique can be used to provide a ready-to-use interactive workflow and end-user experience crafted for one digital library architecture (Greenstone), but applies it to another (Fedora).

Keywords


Digital Libraries, Digital Library Architecture, Digital Library Software, FEDORA. Greenstone Digital Library

References





DOI: https://doi.org/10.17821/srels%2F2019%2Fv56i5%2F147812