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Organisational Innovation: Creating Value to Employees and Customers through Continuous Improvement Process


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1 Assistant Professor & Research Scholar, School of Management & Research, ITM University, Raipur, Chhattisgarh, India
2 Assistant Professor, School of Management & Research, ITM University, Raipur, Chhattisgarh, India
 

In scholarly work on innovation, innovation is rarely associated with the change of organisations. Instead, innovation normally refers to changes in technical solutions associated with products, production processes or service provisions. Furthermore, innovation may refer to alterations in how capital is provided for businesses and households, or to changes in how firms interconnect in order to create new flows of products and services within sectors or value chains. In consequence, the dominating use of the term innovation concerns product, process, service, market, financial and industrial innovation, like originally put forward by Schumpeter (1934).

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  • Organisational Innovation: Creating Value to Employees and Customers through Continuous Improvement Process

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Authors

Anuraag Agarwal
Assistant Professor & Research Scholar, School of Management & Research, ITM University, Raipur, Chhattisgarh, India
Premendra Kumar Sahu
Assistant Professor & Research Scholar, School of Management & Research, ITM University, Raipur, Chhattisgarh, India
Disha Sharma
Assistant Professor, School of Management & Research, ITM University, Raipur, Chhattisgarh, India
Md. Faisal Khan
Assistant Professor & Research Scholar, School of Management & Research, ITM University, Raipur, Chhattisgarh, India

Abstract


In scholarly work on innovation, innovation is rarely associated with the change of organisations. Instead, innovation normally refers to changes in technical solutions associated with products, production processes or service provisions. Furthermore, innovation may refer to alterations in how capital is provided for businesses and households, or to changes in how firms interconnect in order to create new flows of products and services within sectors or value chains. In consequence, the dominating use of the term innovation concerns product, process, service, market, financial and industrial innovation, like originally put forward by Schumpeter (1934).

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References