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Rivastigmine Tartrate Solid Lipid Nanoparticles Loaded Transdermal Film:An In vivo Study


Affiliations
1 Department of Pharmaceutics, JSS College of Pharmacy, JSS Academy of Higher Education and Research, JSS Medical Institutions Campus, Sri Shivarathreeshwara Nagar, Mysuru-570015, Karnataka, India
     

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In the present investigation, Rivastigmine Tartrate incorporated solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) films were made to enhance its uptake to brain via systemic circulation. SLN were prepared by modified emulsification diffusion method and SLN’s loaded transdermal films were prepared by solvent casting method. The optimized Rivastigmine Tartrate SLN loaded formulation was evaluated for pharmacokinetic study and dermal toxicity study. In vivo studies were performed on New Zealand white rabbits and various pharmacokinetic and dermal toxicity parameters were determined. The pharmacokinetic parameters after administration of Rivastigmine Tartrate loaded SLN film were found to be, Tmax 3 h, Cmax 116.17 ± 1.5 ng/mL, AUC0 - ∞ 1848.29±4.87 ng.h/mL, and Ke 0.18 ± 0.028 h-1. The dermal toxicity study was carried out for 3 min, 1 h and 4 h respectively with optimized film and no skin irritation or redness was found. The results highlights that the prepared formulation of SLN loaded films were able to deliver a sustained supply of the Rivastigmine Tartrate.

Keywords

Rivastigmine Tartrate, SLN, Pharmacokinetic Study.
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  • Rivastigmine Tartrate Solid Lipid Nanoparticles Loaded Transdermal Film:An In vivo Study

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Authors

G. Ravi
Department of Pharmaceutics, JSS College of Pharmacy, JSS Academy of Higher Education and Research, JSS Medical Institutions Campus, Sri Shivarathreeshwara Nagar, Mysuru-570015, Karnataka, India
N. Vishal Gupta
Department of Pharmaceutics, JSS College of Pharmacy, JSS Academy of Higher Education and Research, JSS Medical Institutions Campus, Sri Shivarathreeshwara Nagar, Mysuru-570015, Karnataka, India
V. Balamuralidhara
Department of Pharmaceutics, JSS College of Pharmacy, JSS Academy of Higher Education and Research, JSS Medical Institutions Campus, Sri Shivarathreeshwara Nagar, Mysuru-570015, Karnataka, India

Abstract


In the present investigation, Rivastigmine Tartrate incorporated solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) films were made to enhance its uptake to brain via systemic circulation. SLN were prepared by modified emulsification diffusion method and SLN’s loaded transdermal films were prepared by solvent casting method. The optimized Rivastigmine Tartrate SLN loaded formulation was evaluated for pharmacokinetic study and dermal toxicity study. In vivo studies were performed on New Zealand white rabbits and various pharmacokinetic and dermal toxicity parameters were determined. The pharmacokinetic parameters after administration of Rivastigmine Tartrate loaded SLN film were found to be, Tmax 3 h, Cmax 116.17 ± 1.5 ng/mL, AUC0 - ∞ 1848.29±4.87 ng.h/mL, and Ke 0.18 ± 0.028 h-1. The dermal toxicity study was carried out for 3 min, 1 h and 4 h respectively with optimized film and no skin irritation or redness was found. The results highlights that the prepared formulation of SLN loaded films were able to deliver a sustained supply of the Rivastigmine Tartrate.

Keywords


Rivastigmine Tartrate, SLN, Pharmacokinetic Study.

References