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Identification and Characterization of Unique Subgroups of Chronic Pain Individuals with Dispositional Personality Traits


Affiliations
1 Western University, London, ON, N6A 3K7, Canada
2 St. Joseph’s Health Care London, London, ON, N6A 4V2, Canada
3 Western University, London, ON, N6A 3K7, Canada
 

Objective: The current study attempted to identify and characterize distinct CP subgroups based on their level of dispositional personality traits. The secondary objective was to compare the difference among the subgroups in mood, coping, and disability. Methods: Individuals with chronic pain were assessed for demographic, psychosocial, and personality measures. A two-step cluster analysis was conducted in order to identify distinct subgroups of patients based on their level of personality traits. Differences in clinical outcomes were compared using the multivariate analysis of variance based on cluster membership. Results: In 229 participants, three clusters were formed. No significant difference was seen among the clusters on patient demographic factors including age, sex, relationship status, duration of pain, and pain intensity. Those with high levels of dispositional personality traits had greater levels of mood impairment compared to the other two groups (P< 0.05). Significant difference in disability was seen between the subgroups. Conclusions: The study identified a high risk group of CP individuals whose level of personality traits significantly correlated with impaired mood and coping. Use of pharmacological treatment alone may not be successful in improving clinical outcomes among these individuals. Instead, amore comprehensive treatment involving psychological treatments may be important in managing the personality traits that interfere with recovery.
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  • Identification and Characterization of Unique Subgroups of Chronic Pain Individuals with Dispositional Personality Traits

Abstract Views: 544  |  PDF Views: 0

Authors

S. Mehta
Western University, London, ON, N6A 3K7, Canada
D. Rice
St. Joseph’s Health Care London, London, ON, N6A 4V2, Canada
A. McIntyre
St. Joseph’s Health Care London, London, ON, N6A 4V2, Canada
H. Getty
Western University, London, ON, N6A 3K7, Canada
M. Speechley
Western University, London, ON, N6A 3K7, Canada
K. Sequeira
Western University, London, ON, N6A 3K7, Canada
A. P. Shapiro
Western University, London, ON, N6A 3K7, Canada
P. Morley-Forster
Western University, London, ON, N6A 3K7, Canada
R. W. Teasell
Western University, London, ON, N6A 3K7, Canada

Abstract


Objective: The current study attempted to identify and characterize distinct CP subgroups based on their level of dispositional personality traits. The secondary objective was to compare the difference among the subgroups in mood, coping, and disability. Methods: Individuals with chronic pain were assessed for demographic, psychosocial, and personality measures. A two-step cluster analysis was conducted in order to identify distinct subgroups of patients based on their level of personality traits. Differences in clinical outcomes were compared using the multivariate analysis of variance based on cluster membership. Results: In 229 participants, three clusters were formed. No significant difference was seen among the clusters on patient demographic factors including age, sex, relationship status, duration of pain, and pain intensity. Those with high levels of dispositional personality traits had greater levels of mood impairment compared to the other two groups (P< 0.05). Significant difference in disability was seen between the subgroups. Conclusions: The study identified a high risk group of CP individuals whose level of personality traits significantly correlated with impaired mood and coping. Use of pharmacological treatment alone may not be successful in improving clinical outcomes among these individuals. Instead, amore comprehensive treatment involving psychological treatments may be important in managing the personality traits that interfere with recovery.