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Pain Catastrophizing Correlates with Early Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Outcome


Affiliations
1 Department of Cancer Support and Palliative Medicine, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC, H4A 3J1, Canada
2 Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, QC, H3A 1Y2, Canada
3 HoPingKong Centre for Excellence in Education and Practice, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, M5T 2S8, Canada
4 Department of Dentistry, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC, H3C 3J7, Canada
 

Background: Identifying which patients are most likely to be at risk of chronic pain and other postconcussion symptoms following mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is a difficult clinical challenge. Objectives: To examine the relationship between pain catastrophizing, defined as the exaggerated negative appraisal of a pain experience, and early MTBI outcome. Methods. This cross-sectional design included 58 patients diagnosed with a MTBI. In addition to medical chart review, postconcussion symptoms were assessed by self-report at 1 month (Time 1) and 8 weeks (Time 2) after MTBI. Pain severity, psychological distress, level of functionality, and pain catastrophizing were measured by self-report at Time 2. Results: The pain catastrophizing subscales of rumination, magnification, and helplessness were significantly correlated with pain severity (r = .31 to .44), number of postconcussion symptoms reported (r = .35 to .45), psychological distress (r = .57 to .67), and level of functionality (r = −.43 to −.29). Pain catastrophizing scores were significantly higher for patients deemed to be at high risk of postconcussion syndrome (6 or more symptoms reported at both Time 1 and Time 2). Conclusions: Higher levels of pain catastrophizing were related to adverse early MTBI outcomes.Theearly detection of pain catastrophizingmay facilitate goal-oriented interventions to prevent or minimize the development of chronic pain and other postconcussion symptoms.
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  • Pain Catastrophizing Correlates with Early Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Outcome

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Authors

Genevieve Chaput
Department of Cancer Support and Palliative Medicine, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC, H4A 3J1, Canada
Susanne P. Lajoie
Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, QC, H3A 1Y2, Canada
Laura M. Naismith
HoPingKong Centre for Excellence in Education and Practice, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, M5T 2S8, Canada
Gilles Lavigne
Department of Dentistry, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC, H3C 3J7, Canada

Abstract


Background: Identifying which patients are most likely to be at risk of chronic pain and other postconcussion symptoms following mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is a difficult clinical challenge. Objectives: To examine the relationship between pain catastrophizing, defined as the exaggerated negative appraisal of a pain experience, and early MTBI outcome. Methods. This cross-sectional design included 58 patients diagnosed with a MTBI. In addition to medical chart review, postconcussion symptoms were assessed by self-report at 1 month (Time 1) and 8 weeks (Time 2) after MTBI. Pain severity, psychological distress, level of functionality, and pain catastrophizing were measured by self-report at Time 2. Results: The pain catastrophizing subscales of rumination, magnification, and helplessness were significantly correlated with pain severity (r = .31 to .44), number of postconcussion symptoms reported (r = .35 to .45), psychological distress (r = .57 to .67), and level of functionality (r = −.43 to −.29). Pain catastrophizing scores were significantly higher for patients deemed to be at high risk of postconcussion syndrome (6 or more symptoms reported at both Time 1 and Time 2). Conclusions: Higher levels of pain catastrophizing were related to adverse early MTBI outcomes.Theearly detection of pain catastrophizingmay facilitate goal-oriented interventions to prevent or minimize the development of chronic pain and other postconcussion symptoms.