Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Subscription Access
Open Access Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Restricted Access Subscription Access

Impact of Acculturation and Ethnocentrism on Food Consumption:Evidence from Rural India


Affiliations
1 Department of Business Management, Tripura University (A Central University), Suryamaninagar, Tripura, India
     

   Subscribe/Renew Journal


Interaction between multiple cultures in a globalized market place had increased opportunities as well as challenges for organizations. Culture globally is experiencing two opposite movements: the homogenization and the heterogenization. Cultural homogenization leads to a global uniform consumer culture where as heterogenization is making the society bi-cultural. Culture impacts consumer behaviour during consumption by associating symbols to items. Some items resemblances global culture and some are identified with local culture. A confusing cultural impact on consumption is clearly visible in almost all countries due to advancement of technologies and globalization. This paper attempts to investigate the cultural impact on consumption in the era of globalization focusing on food items in the context of rural India. Study measured the role of consumer ethnocentrism and acculturation in rural consumers’ food consumption behavior along with demographic predictors of the two constructs. Study concluded with education and gender as the predictors for the constructs with varied propositions. Study also identified a negative association amongst consumer ethnocentrism and multiple dimensions of acculturation. A positive association of global food consumption and acculturation and negative with local food is also observed. For ethnocentrism, positive association with local food and negative with global is recorded. Study concluded with discussion of the significance of such phenomenon along with future scopes and possible limitations.

Keywords

Consumer Culture, Acculturation, Consumer Ethnocentrism, Consumer Behavior, Rural India.
Subscription Login to verify subscription
User
Notifications
Font Size


  • Ahmed, Z. U., Johnson, J. P., Yang, X., Fatt, C. F., Teng, S. H., & Boon, L. C. (2004). Does country of origin matter for low-involvement products? International Marketing Review, 21(1), 102-120
  • Balabanis, G. R., Diamantopoulos, A., Mueller, D. R., & Melewar, C. T. (2001). The impact of nationalism, patriotism and internationalism on consumer ethnocentric tendencies. Journal of International Business Studies, 32(1), 157-175.
  • Carpenter, J., Moore, M., Doherty, A. M., & Alexander, N. (2013). Acculturation to the global consumer culture: a generational cohort comparison. Journal of Strategic Marketing, 20(5), 41-423.
  • Caruana, A., & Magri, E. (1996). The effect of dogmatism and social class variables on consumer ethnocentrism in Malta. Marketing Intelligence and Planning, 14(4), 39-44.
  • Cleveland, M., & Laroche, M. (2007). Acculturation to Global Consumer Culture: Scale development and research paradigm. Journal of Business Research, 60, 249-259
  • Cleveland, M., Laroche, M., & Papadopolous, N. (2009). Cosmopolitanism, consumer ethnocentrism and materialism: An eight-country study of antecedents and outcomes. Journal of International Marketing, 17, 116-146.
  • Cleveland, M., Erdogan, S., Arıkan, G., & Poyraz, T. (2011). Cosmopolitanism, individual level values and cultural-level values: A cross-cultural study. Journal of Business Research, 64, 934-943.
  • Cutura, M. (2006). The impacts of ethnocentrism on consumer’s evaluation processes and willingness to buy domestic vs. Imported goods in the case of Bosnia-Herzegovina. South East European Journal of Economics and Business, 1(2), 54-63.
  • Hallab, R. (2009). Acculturation to the Global Consumer Culture and Ethnic Identity: an Empirical Study in Lebanon. M.Sc. dissertation, Canada: Concordia Universit
  • Holt, D. B. (2002). Why do brands cause trouble? A dialectical theory of consumer culture and branding. Journal of Consumer Research, 29(June), 70-90.
  • Holt, D. B., Queich, A. J., &Taylor, L. E. (2004). How global brands compete. Harvard Business Review, 82(September), 68-75.
  • Jameson, D. A. (2007). Reconceptualizing Cultural Identity and Its Role in Intercultural Business Communication. Journal of Business Communication, 44(3), 199-235.
  • Josiassen, A., & Karpen, O. I. (2011). Consumer ethnocentrism and willingness to buy: Analyzing the role of three demographic consumer characteristics. International Marketing Review, 28(6), 627-646.
  • Kapferer, J. N. (2001). Is there really no hope for local brands?. Journal of Brand Management, 9(3), 163-169.
  • Klein, J. G., Ettenson, R., & Krishnan, B. C. (2006). Extending the construct of consumer ethnocentrism: when foreign products are preferred. International Marketing Review, 23(3), 304-321.
  • Klein, J. G., & Ettenson, R. (1999). Consumer animosity and consumer ethnocentrism: An analysis of unique antecedents. Journal of International Consumer Marketing, 11(4), 5-24.
  • Kozinets, R. V. (2001). Utopian enterprise: Articulating the meaning of star trek’s culture of Consumption. Journal of Consumer Research, 28(June), 67-89
  • Kumar, A., Fairhurst, A., & Kim, K. Y. (2011). Ethnocentric tendencies of Indian consumers: impact of preference for domestic versus foreign products. The International Review of Retail, Distribution and Consumer Research, 21(4), 323-341
  • Laroche, M., Kim, C., Tomiuk, M. A., & Bélisl, D. (2005). Similarities in Italian and Greek multidimensional ethnic identity: Some implementation in food consumption. Canadian Journal of Administrative Sciences, 22(2), 143-163.
  • Levitt, T. (1983). The globalization of markets. Harvard Business Review, 61(3), 92-102.
  • Okechuku, C. (1994). The importance of product country of origin: a conjoint analysis of the USA, Canada, Germany, and The Netherlands. European Journal of Marketing, 28(4), 5-19.
  • Othman, M. N., Ong, F. S., & Wong, H. W. (2008). Demographic and lifestyle profiles ethnocentric and non-ethnocentric urban Malaysian consumers. Asian Journal of Business and Accounting, 1, 5-26.
  • Parsons, T. (1951). The social system. London: Routledge.
  • Rahman, M. H., Morshed, M., & Hossan, M. T. 2011. Identifying and measuring consumer ethnocentric tendencies in Bangladesh. World Review of Business Research, 1(1), 71-89.
  • Ramsaran-Fowdar, R. R. (2010). Are males and elderly people more consumer ethnocentric? World Journal of Management, 2(1), 117-129.
  • Ranjbarian, B., Barari, M., & Zabihzade, K. (2011). Ethnocentrism among Iranian Consumer with different consumption habits. International Journal of Marketing Studies, 3(3), 30-41.
  • Reardon, J., Miller, C., Vida, I., & Kim, I. 2005. The effects of ethnocentrism and economic development on the formation of brand and ad attitudes in transitional economies. European Journal of Marketing, 39(7/8), 737-754.
  • Renko, N., Karanovic, B. C., & Matic, M. (2012). Influence of consumer ethnocentrism on purchase intentions: case of Croatia. Retrieved from http://hrcak.srce.hr/file/138614
  • Sharma, S., Shimp, A. T., & Shin, J. (1995). Consumer ethnocentrism: A test of antecedents. Journal of Academy of Marketing Science, 23(1), 26-37.
  • Shimp, T. A., & Sharma, S. (1987). Consumer ethnocentrism: Construction and validation of the CETSCALE. Journal of Marketing Research, 24, 280-289.
  • Shim, S., & Yen, A. C. (1996). Acculturation characteristics and apparel shopping orientations: Chinese students and spouses from the people’s republic of China Residing in the Southwest. Clothing and Textiles Research Journal, 14(3), 204-215
  • Sobol, K. (2008). The ‘global consumer culture’: An empirical study in the Netherlands. M.Sc. dissertation, Canada: Concordia University.
  • Steenkamp, J-B. E. M., Batra, R., & Alden, L. D. (2003). How perceived globalness creates brand value. Journal of International Business Studies, 34(1), 53-65
  • Vida, I., & Fairhurst, A. (1999). Factors underlying the phenomenon of consumer Ethnocentricity: Evidence from four central European countries. The International Review of Retail, Distribution and Consumer Research, 9(4), 321-337.
  • Wall, M., Heslop, A. L., & Hofstra, G. (1988). Male and female viewpoints of countries as producers of consumer goods. Journal of International Consumer Marketing, 1(1), 1-2
  • Yeong, N. C., Mohamad, O., & Omar, A. (2007). Purchase preference of selected Malaysian motorcycle buyers: The discriminating role of perception of country of origin of brand and ethnocentrism. Asian Academy of Management Journal, 12(1), 1-2
  • Yip, G. S. (1995). Total global strategy: Managing for worldwide competitive advantage. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Abstract Views: 19

PDF Views: 1




  • Impact of Acculturation and Ethnocentrism on Food Consumption:Evidence from Rural India

Abstract Views: 19  |  PDF Views: 1

Authors

Manish Das
Department of Business Management, Tripura University (A Central University), Suryamaninagar, Tripura, India

Abstract


Interaction between multiple cultures in a globalized market place had increased opportunities as well as challenges for organizations. Culture globally is experiencing two opposite movements: the homogenization and the heterogenization. Cultural homogenization leads to a global uniform consumer culture where as heterogenization is making the society bi-cultural. Culture impacts consumer behaviour during consumption by associating symbols to items. Some items resemblances global culture and some are identified with local culture. A confusing cultural impact on consumption is clearly visible in almost all countries due to advancement of technologies and globalization. This paper attempts to investigate the cultural impact on consumption in the era of globalization focusing on food items in the context of rural India. Study measured the role of consumer ethnocentrism and acculturation in rural consumers’ food consumption behavior along with demographic predictors of the two constructs. Study concluded with education and gender as the predictors for the constructs with varied propositions. Study also identified a negative association amongst consumer ethnocentrism and multiple dimensions of acculturation. A positive association of global food consumption and acculturation and negative with local food is also observed. For ethnocentrism, positive association with local food and negative with global is recorded. Study concluded with discussion of the significance of such phenomenon along with future scopes and possible limitations.

Keywords


Consumer Culture, Acculturation, Consumer Ethnocentrism, Consumer Behavior, Rural India.

References