Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Subscription Access

Mindfulness for Motor and Nonmor Dysfunctions in Parkinson’s Disease


Affiliations
1 UQ Centre for Clinical Research, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4029, Australia
2 School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4067, Australia
3 Neurology Research Centre, Royal Brisbane & Women’s Hospital, Brisbane, QLD 4029, Australia
 

Background: Motor and nonmotor symptoms negatively influence Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients’ quality of life. Mindfulness interventions have been a recent focus in PD. The present study explores effectiveness of a manualized group mindfulness intervention tailored for PD in improving both motor and neuropsychiatric deficits in PD. Methods: Fourteen PD patients completed an 8-week mindfulness intervention that included 6 sessions. The Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ), Geriatric Anxiety Inventory, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, PD Cognitive Rating Scale, Unified PD Rating Scale, PD Quality of Life Questionnaire, and Outcome Questionnaire (OQ-45) were administered before and after the intervention. Participants also completed the FFMQ-15 at each session. Gains at postassessment and at 6-month follow-up were compared to baseline using paired t-tests and Wilcoxon nonparametric tests. Results: A significant increase in FFMQ-Observe subscale, a reduction in anxiety, depression, and OQ-45 symptom distress, an increase in PDCRS-Subcortical scores, and an improvement in postural instability, gait, and rigidity motor symptoms were observed at postassessment. Gains for the PDCRS were sustained at follow-up. Conclusion: The mindfulness intervention tailored for PD is associated with reduced anxiety and depression and improved cognitive and motor functioning. A randomised controlled trial using a large sample of PD patients is warranted.
User
Notifications
Font Size

Abstract Views: 105

PDF Views: 1




  • Mindfulness for Motor and Nonmor Dysfunctions in Parkinson’s Disease

Abstract Views: 105  |  PDF Views: 1

Authors

Nadeeka N.W. Dissanayaka
UQ Centre for Clinical Research, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4029, Australia
Farah Idu Jion
UQ Centre for Clinical Research, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4029, Australia
Nancy A. Pachana
School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4067, Australia
John D. O’Sullivan
Neurology Research Centre, Royal Brisbane & Women’s Hospital, Brisbane, QLD 4029, Australia
Rodney Marsh
UQ Centre for Clinical Research, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4029, Australia
Gerard J. Byrne
UQ Centre for Clinical Research, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4029, Australia
Paul Harnett
School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4067, Australia

Abstract


Background: Motor and nonmotor symptoms negatively influence Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients’ quality of life. Mindfulness interventions have been a recent focus in PD. The present study explores effectiveness of a manualized group mindfulness intervention tailored for PD in improving both motor and neuropsychiatric deficits in PD. Methods: Fourteen PD patients completed an 8-week mindfulness intervention that included 6 sessions. The Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ), Geriatric Anxiety Inventory, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, PD Cognitive Rating Scale, Unified PD Rating Scale, PD Quality of Life Questionnaire, and Outcome Questionnaire (OQ-45) were administered before and after the intervention. Participants also completed the FFMQ-15 at each session. Gains at postassessment and at 6-month follow-up were compared to baseline using paired t-tests and Wilcoxon nonparametric tests. Results: A significant increase in FFMQ-Observe subscale, a reduction in anxiety, depression, and OQ-45 symptom distress, an increase in PDCRS-Subcortical scores, and an improvement in postural instability, gait, and rigidity motor symptoms were observed at postassessment. Gains for the PDCRS were sustained at follow-up. Conclusion: The mindfulness intervention tailored for PD is associated with reduced anxiety and depression and improved cognitive and motor functioning. A randomised controlled trial using a large sample of PD patients is warranted.