Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Subscription Access
Open Access Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Restricted Access Subscription Access

Indian Television in the Eras of Pre-Liberalisation and Liberalisation


Affiliations
1 Jagran Lakecity University, India
     

   Subscribe/Renew Journal


India witnessed a revolution in the television communication landscape following the shift in the economic policies in 1991. This analytical study looks into the changes and additions in the functions performed by mass communication using television medium before and after the implementation of liberalization policies in India. Tables are included to provide overviews of the historical developments at different periods and to distinguish the functions performed by television communication. In addition to information, education, entertainment, correlation and mobilization functions, empowerment and need satisfaction are also accounted as functions added in the due course of mass communication progression in the transnational and digitized era.

Keywords

Pre-Liberalisation Era, Liberalization, Broadcasting, Doordarshan, Prasar Bharati, Digitization.
Subscription Login to verify subscription
User
Notifications
Font Size


  • Agrawal, B. C. (2000). Television Studies in India: The State of Art. In B. C. Agrawal, Higher Education through Television: The Indian Experience (pp. 129-141). New Delhi: Concept Publishing Company.
  • Agrawal, B. C., & Malek, M. R. (1986). Televsion in Kheda. New Delhi: Concept Publishing.
  • Albarran, A. B. (2010). Management of Electronic Media. Boston, U.S: Wadsworth Cengage Learning.
  • All India Radio. (n.d.). Retrieved March 02, 2015, from Prasar Bharati: allindiaradio.gov.in/default.aspx
  • Athique. (2012). Indian Media: Global Approaches.
  • Balaji, V., & Balasubramanian, K. Information Village: Communication and Agricultural Markets. In I. Ramchandani, Students' Britanica India (pp. 313-319).
  • Committee on Broadcasting and Information Media, I. (1966). Radio and Television: Report. New Delhi: Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, Govt. of India.
  • David, C. R. (1986). Communication in Theological Education. Madurai: Vanguard press.
  • Dwivedi, R. (2008). India 2008. New Delhi: Tata - McGraw Hill Publihing Company Limited.
  • Ganguly-Scrase, R., & Scrase, T. J. (2009). Globalised Media: Television and its Impact on middleclass morals, culture and identity. In R. Ganguly-Scrase, & T. J. Scrase, Globalisation and the Middle Classes in India: The Social and Cultural Impact of Neoliberal Reforms (pp. 151-173). Oxon: Routledge.
  • Gokulsing, M. K., & Dissanayake, W. (2009). Part 1 Film-Television - TV Soaps-Indian Feminisms. In M. K. Gokulsing, & W. Dissanayake, Popular Culture in a Globalised India. Oxon: Routledge. groupm. (2011, December 05). groupm-Press and News details. Retrieved from Groupm: http://www.groupm.com/pressandnews/details/733
  • Gupta, N. (1998). Switching Channels: Ideologies of Television in India. Oxford University Press.
  • Holden, T., & Scrase, T. J. (2006). Medi@sia: Global Media/tion in and out of Context. New York: Routledge.
  • Holt, J., & Perren, A. (. (2011). Media Industries: History, Theory and Method. West Sussex: Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Huff, K. W. (2008). Public Speaking: A concise overview for 21st Century. New York: Peter Lang Publishing, Inc.
  • IBF, I. B. (n.d.). SELF-REGULATORY CONTENT GUIDELINES FOR NON-NEWS & CURRENT AFFAIRS TELEVISION CHANNELS. Retrieved March 5, 2015, from Indian Broadcasting Foundation: http:// www.ibfindia.com/sites/default/files/pdf/Self%20Regulatory%20Guidelines%20for%20non-news%20%26%20current%20affairs%20programmes.pdf
  • Indian Express. (2012, March 14). The Census Truth: More Indians have Access to Phones than Toilets. Retrieved Novemeber 15, 2013, from The Indian Express: http://articles.timeso india.india times. com/20 12-03-14/india /31164801_1_households-penetration-mobile-phone
  • Kapil Desai, M. (2002). Indian Television in the Era of Globalisation: Unity,. Quaderns del CAC: (14), 59-69.
  • King, R. G. (1978). Fundamentals of Human Communication. Colummbus Ohio: Charles E. Merril Publishing Company.
  • Kishan-Thussu, D. (2011). Infotainment Inc.: The Ascent of a Global Ideology. In S. Papathanassopoulos, Media Perspective for the 21st Century (pp. 68-82). New York: Routledge.
  • Kohli-Khandekar, V. (2013). The Indian Media Business. New Delhi: SAGE Response.
  • Kumar, K. J. (2012). Mass Communication in India. Mumbai: Jaico Books.
  • McQuail, D. (2005). Mass Communication Theory. Thousand Oaks, California: SAGE Publications Ltd.
  • Mehta, N. (2008). Introduction: Satellite Television, Identity and Globalisation in Contemporary India. In N. (Mehta, Television in India: Satellites, Politics and Cultural Change (pp. 1-12). Abigdon, Oxon: Routledge.
  • Mendelsohn, H. (1966). Mass Entertainment. New Haven, CT: College and University Press. NBA, N. B. (n.d.). NBA_code-of-ethics_english. Retrieved March 5, 2015, from http://www.nbanewdelhi.com/:http://www.nbanewdelhi.com/pdf/final/NBA_code-ofethics_ english.pdf
  • NBA, N. B. (n.d.). NBA_code-of-ethics_english. Retrieved March 5, 2015, from http:// www.nbanewdelhi.com/: http://www.nbanewdelhi.com/pdf/final/NBA_code-ofethics_ english.pdf
  • Pande, N. (2012). TV Journalism: An introduction to practices. Delhi: Balaji Offset. Prasar Bharati. (n.d.). Retrieved March 02, 2015, from Prasar Bharati: www.prasarbharati.gov.in/default.aspx
  • Prasar Bharati. (2011). Prasar Bharati Annual Report 2010-11. New Delhi: Prasar Bharati (Broadcasting Corporation of India).
  • Prasar Bharati. (n.d.). Welcome to Prasar Bharati. Retrieved March 02, 2015, from PRASAR BHARATI: Prasarbharati.gov.in
  • Ram, N. (1997). Forward. In R. Parthasarathy, Journalism in India (pp. vii - xvi). New Delhi: Sterling Publisher s.
  • Rampal, K. R. (2001). Cultural Bane or Sociological Boon? Impact of Satellite Television on Urban Youth in India. In Y. R. Kamalipour, & K. Rampal, Media, Sex, Violence, and Drugs in the Global Village (pp. 112-132). Boston: Rowman and Littlefield Publihers, Inc.
  • Rani, U. N. (2006). Educational Television in India: Challenges and Issues. New Delhi: Discovery Publishing House.
  • Rashmi, B., & Das, A. (2012). Twenty Years of India's Liberalisation Experiences and Lessons. Geneva: United Nations Publication.
  • Seetha. (2012). An Audit - From the Liberal Perspective. In The Indian Economic Liberalisation Story: An Audit from a Liberal Perspective - Discussion Papers presented at a Seminarin Mumbai on May 5, 2012 (pp. 7-32). Mumabai: Project for Economic Education.
  • Shannon, C. E. (1948, July, October). A Mathematical theory of Communication. Retrieved June 4, 2011, from cm.Bell-labs.com: http://cm.bell-labs.com/cm/ms/what/shannonday/shannon1948.pdf
  • Sharma, A. K. (2012). Radio and Television Broadcasting. New Delhi: Random Publications.
  • Sharma, A. K. (2012). Radio and Television Broadcasting. New Delhi: Random Publications. Shodhganga. (n.d.). shodhganga.inflibnet.ac.in. Retrieved March 10, 2015, from inflibnet.ac.in: shodhganga.inflibnet.ac.in:8080/jspui/bitstream/10603/20679/8/08_chapter.3.pdf
  • Sinha, N. ( 1996). India: Television and National Politics. In R. M. (Ed.), Public Broadcasting for the 21st Century (pp. 212-229). Luton, England: John Libbey Media.
  • Sorlin, P. (1994). Mass Media. London: Routledge.
  • Thompson, J. B. (1995). The Media Modernity: A Social Theory of the Media. Stanford.
  • Turow, J. (2011). Media Today: An Introduction to Mass Communication. Veerkumar, V., & Jaiswal, N. (2015). Impact of Television Advertisements on Children's . Hamburg, Germany: Anchor Academic Publishing.
  • Vijayalakshmi, P. (2005). Foreign Television and Indian Youth: Changing attitudes . New delhi: Concept Publishing Company.
  • Wells, W. D., Burnet, J., & Sandra, M. (2006). Advertising: Principles and Practice. New Delhi: Pearson Prentice Hall.
  • Wright, C. R. (1974). Functional Analysis and Mass Communication Revisited. In B. J. G, & K. E., The Uses of Mass Communication (pp. 197-212). Beverly Hills: SAGE Punblications, Inc. Retrived from http://repository.upenn.edu/asc/8_papers

Abstract Views: 787

PDF Views: 2




  • Indian Television in the Eras of Pre-Liberalisation and Liberalisation

Abstract Views: 787  |  PDF Views: 2

Authors

Shanthi Mathai
Jagran Lakecity University, India

Abstract


India witnessed a revolution in the television communication landscape following the shift in the economic policies in 1991. This analytical study looks into the changes and additions in the functions performed by mass communication using television medium before and after the implementation of liberalization policies in India. Tables are included to provide overviews of the historical developments at different periods and to distinguish the functions performed by television communication. In addition to information, education, entertainment, correlation and mobilization functions, empowerment and need satisfaction are also accounted as functions added in the due course of mass communication progression in the transnational and digitized era.

Keywords


Pre-Liberalisation Era, Liberalization, Broadcasting, Doordarshan, Prasar Bharati, Digitization.

References





DOI: https://doi.org/10.15655/mw%2F2015%2Fv6i2%2F65672