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Maternal-Cord Blood Vitamin D Correlations Vary by Maternal Levels


Affiliations
1 Department of Public Health Sciences, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI 48202, United States
2 Department of Women’s Health, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI 48202, United States
 

Vitamin D levels of pregnant women and their neonates tend to be related; however, it is unknown whether there are any subgroups in which they are not related. 25-Hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D] was measured in prenatal maternal and child cord blood samples of participants (n=241 pairs) in a birth cohort. Spearman correlations were examined within subgroups defined by prenatal and delivery factors. Cord blood as a percentage of prenatal 25(OH)D level was calculated and characteristics compared between those who did and did not have ≥25% and ≥50% of the maternal level and those who did and did not have a detectable 25(OH)D level. The correlation among Black children was lower than in White children. When the maternal 25(OH)D level was >15 ng/mL, the overall correlation was r = 0.16. Most children had a 25(OH)D cord blood level less than half of their mother's; 15.4% had a level that was >25% of their mother's. Winter birth and maternal level were associated with the level being less than 25%. Children with undetectable levels were more likely to be Black and less likely to be firstborn. These data suggest mothers may reduce their contribution to the fetus's 25(OH)D supply once their own level becomes low.
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  • Maternal-Cord Blood Vitamin D Correlations Vary by Maternal Levels

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Authors

Ganesa Wegienka
Department of Public Health Sciences, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI 48202, United States
Hareena Kaur
Department of Public Health Sciences, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI 48202, United States
Roopina Sangha
Department of Women’s Health, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI 48202, United States
Andrea E. Cassidy-Bushrow
Department of Public Health Sciences, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI 48202, United States

Abstract


Vitamin D levels of pregnant women and their neonates tend to be related; however, it is unknown whether there are any subgroups in which they are not related. 25-Hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D] was measured in prenatal maternal and child cord blood samples of participants (n=241 pairs) in a birth cohort. Spearman correlations were examined within subgroups defined by prenatal and delivery factors. Cord blood as a percentage of prenatal 25(OH)D level was calculated and characteristics compared between those who did and did not have ≥25% and ≥50% of the maternal level and those who did and did not have a detectable 25(OH)D level. The correlation among Black children was lower than in White children. When the maternal 25(OH)D level was >15 ng/mL, the overall correlation was r = 0.16. Most children had a 25(OH)D cord blood level less than half of their mother's; 15.4% had a level that was >25% of their mother's. Winter birth and maternal level were associated with the level being less than 25%. Children with undetectable levels were more likely to be Black and less likely to be firstborn. These data suggest mothers may reduce their contribution to the fetus's 25(OH)D supply once their own level becomes low.