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Beliefs, Barriers, and Preferences of European Overweight Women to Adopt a Healthier Lifestyle in Pregnancy to Minimize Risk of Developing Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: An Explorative Study


Affiliations
1 Department of Public and Occupational Health, EMGO+-Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Centre, 1081 BT Amsterdam, Netherlands
2 Department of Health Sciences, EMGO+-Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University, 1081 BT Amsterdam, Netherlands
3 Institute of Health andWellbeing, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8RZ, United Kingdom
4 Institute of Metabolic Science, Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, United Kingdom
5 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Graz, 8036 Graz, Austria
6 Institut de Recerca de l’Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, 08026 Barcelona, Spain
7 Divison of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine III, Medical University of Vienna, 1010 Vienna, Austria
8 KU Leuven Department of Development and Regeneration: Pregnancy, Fetus and Neonate, Gynaecology and Obstetrics, University Hospitals Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
9 Recherche en Sante Lawson SA, 9552 St. Gallen, Switzerland
10 Center for Pregnant Women with Diabetes, Departments of Endocrinology and Obstetrics, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, 1165 Copenhagen, Denmark
11 Poznan University of Medical Sciences, 61-701 Poznan, Poland
12 BAP Health Outcomes Research SL, 33010 Oviedo, Spain
13 Universita degli Studi di Padova, 35122 Padova, Italy
14 Universita di Pisa, 56126 Pisa, Italy
15 National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland
16 Departments of Endocrinology and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Odense University Hospital, 5000 Odense, Denmark
17 Department of Medical Psychology, EMGO+-Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Centre, 1081 BT Amsterdam, Netherlands
 

Introduction: We explored beliefs, perceived barriers, and preferences regarding lifestyle changes among overweight European pregnant women to help inform the development of future lifestyle interventions in the prevention of gestational diabetes mellitus. Methods: An explorative mixed methods, two-staged study was conducted to gather information from pregnant European women (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2). In three European countries 21 interviews were conducted, followed by 71 questionnaires in six other European countries. Content analysis and descriptive and chi-square statistics were applied (p < 0.05). Results: Women preferred to obtain detailed information about their personal risk. The health of their baby was a majormotivating factor. Perceived barriers for physical activity included pregnancy-specific issues such as tiredness and experiencing physical complaints. Insufficient time was a barrier more frequently reported by women with children. Abstaining from snacking was identified as a challenge for the majority of women, especially for those without children. Women preferred to obtain support from their partner, as well as health professionals and valued flexible lifestyle programs. Conclusions: Healthcare professionals need to inform overweight pregnant women about their personal risk, discuss lifestyle modification, and assist in weight management. Lifestyle programs should be tailored to the individual, taking into account barriers experienced by overweight first-time mothers and multipara women.
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  • Beliefs, Barriers, and Preferences of European Overweight Women to Adopt a Healthier Lifestyle in Pregnancy to Minimize Risk of Developing Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: An Explorative Study

Abstract Views: 48  |  PDF Views: 0

Authors

Judith G. M. Jelsma
Department of Public and Occupational Health, EMGO+-Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Centre, 1081 BT Amsterdam, Netherlands
Karen M. van Leeuwen
Department of Health Sciences, EMGO+-Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University, 1081 BT Amsterdam, Netherlands
Nicolette Oostdam
Department of Public and Occupational Health, EMGO+-Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Centre, 1081 BT Amsterdam, Netherlands
Christopher Bunn
Institute of Health andWellbeing, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8RZ, United Kingdom
David Simmons
Institute of Metabolic Science, Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, United Kingdom
Gernot Desoye
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Graz, 8036 Graz, Austria
Rosa Corcoy
Institut de Recerca de l’Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, 08026 Barcelona, Spain
Juan M. Adelantado
Institut de Recerca de l’Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, 08026 Barcelona, Spain
Alexandra Kautzky-Willer
Divison of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine III, Medical University of Vienna, 1010 Vienna, Austria
Jürgen Harreiter
Divison of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine III, Medical University of Vienna, 1010 Vienna, Austria
Frans Andre van Assche
KU Leuven Department of Development and Regeneration: Pregnancy, Fetus and Neonate, Gynaecology and Obstetrics, University Hospitals Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
Roland Devlieger
KU Leuven Department of Development and Regeneration: Pregnancy, Fetus and Neonate, Gynaecology and Obstetrics, University Hospitals Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
Dirk Timmerman
KU Leuven Department of Development and Regeneration: Pregnancy, Fetus and Neonate, Gynaecology and Obstetrics, University Hospitals Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
David Hill
Recherche en Sante Lawson SA, 9552 St. Gallen, Switzerland
Peter Damm
Center for Pregnant Women with Diabetes, Departments of Endocrinology and Obstetrics, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, 1165 Copenhagen, Denmark
Elisabeth R. Mathiesen
Center for Pregnant Women with Diabetes, Departments of Endocrinology and Obstetrics, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, 1165 Copenhagen, Denmark
Ewa Wender-Ozegowska
Poznan University of Medical Sciences, 61-701 Poznan, Poland
Agnieszka Zawiejska
Poznan University of Medical Sciences, 61-701 Poznan, Poland
Pablo Rebollo
BAP Health Outcomes Research SL, 33010 Oviedo, Spain
Annunziata Lapolla
Universita degli Studi di Padova, 35122 Padova, Italy
Maria G. Dalfra
Universita degli Studi di Padova, 35122 Padova, Italy
Stefano del Prato
Universita di Pisa, 56126 Pisa, Italy
Alessandra Bertolotto
Universita di Pisa, 56126 Pisa, Italy
Fidelma Dunne
National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland
Dorte M. Jensen
Departments of Endocrinology and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Odense University Hospital, 5000 Odense, Denmark
Lise Lotte T. Andersen
Departments of Endocrinology and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Odense University Hospital, 5000 Odense, Denmark
Frank J. Snoek
Department of Medical Psychology, EMGO+-Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Centre, 1081 BT Amsterdam, Netherlands
Mireille N. M. van Poppel
Department of Public and Occupational Health, EMGO+-Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Centre, 1081 BT Amsterdam, Netherlands

Abstract


Introduction: We explored beliefs, perceived barriers, and preferences regarding lifestyle changes among overweight European pregnant women to help inform the development of future lifestyle interventions in the prevention of gestational diabetes mellitus. Methods: An explorative mixed methods, two-staged study was conducted to gather information from pregnant European women (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2). In three European countries 21 interviews were conducted, followed by 71 questionnaires in six other European countries. Content analysis and descriptive and chi-square statistics were applied (p < 0.05). Results: Women preferred to obtain detailed information about their personal risk. The health of their baby was a majormotivating factor. Perceived barriers for physical activity included pregnancy-specific issues such as tiredness and experiencing physical complaints. Insufficient time was a barrier more frequently reported by women with children. Abstaining from snacking was identified as a challenge for the majority of women, especially for those without children. Women preferred to obtain support from their partner, as well as health professionals and valued flexible lifestyle programs. Conclusions: Healthcare professionals need to inform overweight pregnant women about their personal risk, discuss lifestyle modification, and assist in weight management. Lifestyle programs should be tailored to the individual, taking into account barriers experienced by overweight first-time mothers and multipara women.