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Role of Dharma (Righteousness) in Workplace Spirituality:Evidence from Hitopadesa


Affiliations
1 Chakravarti Rajgopalachari Institute of Management (CRIM), Barkatullah University, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India
2 Indian Institute of Forest Management, Nehru Nagar, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India
     

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The paper proposes a framework of dharma (righteousness) to foster workplace/organisational spirituality. For instilling spirituality in employees that may translate into organisational/workplace spirituality, an ancient Indian text, that is, Hitopadesa, provides guidance in verse. The framework of dharma (righteousness) constructed, on the basis of a theoretically sampled verse of Hitopadesa, suggests four ethical values that could assist in sensing and experiencing one’s spirit in a relatively clearer form. This clear perception might assist in spiritual expression through work or in a workplace. The four values are: (1) sanyam (self-control); (2) satya (truthfulness); (3) sila (character); and (4) daya (compassion). The paper explicates the proposed dharma (righteousness) framework and suggests its implications for the mutual benefits of employees as well as for organisations.

Keywords

Dharma, Righteousness, Workplace Spirituality, Self-Control, Morality, Business Ethics, Compassion, Truthfulness.
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  • Role of Dharma (Righteousness) in Workplace Spirituality:Evidence from Hitopadesa

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Authors

Piyush Gotise
Chakravarti Rajgopalachari Institute of Management (CRIM), Barkatullah University, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India
Bal Krishna Upadhyay
Indian Institute of Forest Management, Nehru Nagar, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India

Abstract


The paper proposes a framework of dharma (righteousness) to foster workplace/organisational spirituality. For instilling spirituality in employees that may translate into organisational/workplace spirituality, an ancient Indian text, that is, Hitopadesa, provides guidance in verse. The framework of dharma (righteousness) constructed, on the basis of a theoretically sampled verse of Hitopadesa, suggests four ethical values that could assist in sensing and experiencing one’s spirit in a relatively clearer form. This clear perception might assist in spiritual expression through work or in a workplace. The four values are: (1) sanyam (self-control); (2) satya (truthfulness); (3) sila (character); and (4) daya (compassion). The paper explicates the proposed dharma (righteousness) framework and suggests its implications for the mutual benefits of employees as well as for organisations.

Keywords


Dharma, Righteousness, Workplace Spirituality, Self-Control, Morality, Business Ethics, Compassion, Truthfulness.

References