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The Association of Physical Activity during Weekdays and Weekend with Body Composition in Young Adults


Affiliations
1 Department of Exercise Science, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, United States
2 Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, United States
3 School of PublicHealth, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506, United States
4 Department of Kinesiology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, United States
 

Physical activity (PA) is a key contributor in long-term weight management but there remains limited research on the association between weekly PA patterns and weight change. The purpose of the present study was to examine the prospective association between weekly PA patterns and weight change in generally healthy young adults. Anthropometric measurements, including dual X-ray absorptiometry, were obtained every 3 months over a period of one year in 338 adults (53% male). At each measurement time, participants wore a multisensor device for a minimum of 10 days to determine total daily energy expenditure and time spent sleeping, sedentary, in light PA (LPA), in moderate PA (MPA), and in vigorous PA (VPA). PA did not differ between weekdays and the weekend at baseline. Twenty-four-hour sleep time, however, was significantly longer during weekends compared to weekdays, which was associated with less time spent sedentary.Weight loss was associated with a significant increase in LPA at the expense of sedentary time during the weekend but not during weekdays. Regression analyses further revealed an inverse association between change inVPAduring theweekend and body composition at 12-month follow-up. Taken together, these results suggest thatweekend PA plays an important role in long-term weight management.
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  • The Association of Physical Activity during Weekdays and Weekend with Body Composition in Young Adults

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Authors

Clemens Drenowatz
Department of Exercise Science, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, United States
Nicole Gribben
Department of Exercise Science, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, United States
Michael D. Wirth
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, United States
Gregory A. Hand
School of PublicHealth, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506, United States
Robin P. Shook
Department of Kinesiology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, United States
Stephanie Burgess
Department of Exercise Science, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, United States
Steven N. Blair
Department of Exercise Science, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, United States

Abstract


Physical activity (PA) is a key contributor in long-term weight management but there remains limited research on the association between weekly PA patterns and weight change. The purpose of the present study was to examine the prospective association between weekly PA patterns and weight change in generally healthy young adults. Anthropometric measurements, including dual X-ray absorptiometry, were obtained every 3 months over a period of one year in 338 adults (53% male). At each measurement time, participants wore a multisensor device for a minimum of 10 days to determine total daily energy expenditure and time spent sleeping, sedentary, in light PA (LPA), in moderate PA (MPA), and in vigorous PA (VPA). PA did not differ between weekdays and the weekend at baseline. Twenty-four-hour sleep time, however, was significantly longer during weekends compared to weekdays, which was associated with less time spent sedentary.Weight loss was associated with a significant increase in LPA at the expense of sedentary time during the weekend but not during weekdays. Regression analyses further revealed an inverse association between change inVPAduring theweekend and body composition at 12-month follow-up. Taken together, these results suggest thatweekend PA plays an important role in long-term weight management.