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Clinical Manifestations Associated with overweight/Obesity in Puerto Ricans with Fibromyalgia Syndrome


Affiliations
1 Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences Campus, San Juan, PR 00936, United States
 

Objective: To determine the clinical manifestations associated with overweight/obesity in Hispanics from Puerto Rico with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed in 144 patients with FMS (per American College of Rheumatology (ACR) classification criteria). Sociodemographic features, FMS-related symptoms, tender points (per ACR criteria), comorbidities, and FMS treatment were examined. BMI was calculated and patients were grouped into two categories: BMI ≤ 24.9 kg/m2 (nonoverweight/obese) and BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 (overweight/obese). Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to evaluate differences between the study groups. Results: The mean (standard deviation (SD)) age of patients was 50.2 (9.9) years; 95.1% were females and 75.7% were overweight/obese. In the bivariate analysis, overweight/obese patients were more likely to have self-reported memory impairment, anxiety, shortness of breath, and urinary frequency than nonoverweight/obese patients. In addition, the tender point count was higher in the overweight/obese group. In the logistic regression analyses, self-reported memory impairment and urinary frequency differences remained significant after adjusting for confounding variables. Conclusion: In this population of Puerto Ricans with FMS, overweight/obese patients experienced more FMS-related manifestations than nonoverweight/obese individuals. However, prospective studies are needed to confirm these associations and to elucidate if weight reduction interventions could favorably impact the severity of FMS.
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  • Clinical Manifestations Associated with overweight/Obesity in Puerto Ricans with Fibromyalgia Syndrome

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Authors

Ruth M. Fred-Jimenez
Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences Campus, San Juan, PR 00936, United States
Mariangeli Arroyo-Avila
Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences Campus, San Juan, PR 00936, United States
Angel M. Mayor
Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences Campus, San Juan, PR 00936, United States
Grissel Rios
Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences Campus, San Juan, PR 00936, United States
Luis M. Vila
Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences Campus, San Juan, PR 00936, United States

Abstract


Objective: To determine the clinical manifestations associated with overweight/obesity in Hispanics from Puerto Rico with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed in 144 patients with FMS (per American College of Rheumatology (ACR) classification criteria). Sociodemographic features, FMS-related symptoms, tender points (per ACR criteria), comorbidities, and FMS treatment were examined. BMI was calculated and patients were grouped into two categories: BMI ≤ 24.9 kg/m2 (nonoverweight/obese) and BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 (overweight/obese). Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to evaluate differences between the study groups. Results: The mean (standard deviation (SD)) age of patients was 50.2 (9.9) years; 95.1% were females and 75.7% were overweight/obese. In the bivariate analysis, overweight/obese patients were more likely to have self-reported memory impairment, anxiety, shortness of breath, and urinary frequency than nonoverweight/obese patients. In addition, the tender point count was higher in the overweight/obese group. In the logistic regression analyses, self-reported memory impairment and urinary frequency differences remained significant after adjusting for confounding variables. Conclusion: In this population of Puerto Ricans with FMS, overweight/obese patients experienced more FMS-related manifestations than nonoverweight/obese individuals. However, prospective studies are needed to confirm these associations and to elucidate if weight reduction interventions could favorably impact the severity of FMS.