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GST Perceptions


Affiliations
1 Assistant Professor, Department of Commerce, Tripura University (A Central University), West Tripura, Tripura, India
2 M.Com. Department of Commerce, Tripura University (A Central University), West Tripura, Tripura, India
3 JRF Research Scholar, Department of Education, Tripura University (A Central University), West Tripura, Tripura, India
     

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The Goods and Services Tax (GST), a big and much awaited bet, likely to alter the Indian economy’s landscape significantly. It has been estimated that the combined GST collection would exceed the individual collections of erstwhile excise and service tax collections which would contribute around 6 percent in GDP. The study has attempted to assess the selective stakeholders’ GST perceptions during the transition period of its rollover. It has framed two hypotheses and a conceptual model for executing the study. By adopting the cross-sectional research design and applying the survey strategy, it has gathered data from 170 sample respondents. Convenience sampling technique has been used for collecting the primary data. Reliability and validity of the tool has also been tested. Significant statistical results have indicated that the taxpayers’ attitudes and costs of compliance have probably effected the GST compliance which, in turn would curb inflations and evading the tax evasions. Limitations, practical implications and future research directions have been highlighted.

Keywords

GST, Tax Compliance, Tax Evasions, Survey, Inferential Statistics.
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  • GST Perceptions

Abstract Views: 47  |  PDF Views: 1

Authors

Rajat Deb
Assistant Professor, Department of Commerce, Tripura University (A Central University), West Tripura, Tripura, India
Raju Debnath
M.Com. Department of Commerce, Tripura University (A Central University), West Tripura, Tripura, India
Priti Kumari Mahto
JRF Research Scholar, Department of Education, Tripura University (A Central University), West Tripura, Tripura, India

Abstract


The Goods and Services Tax (GST), a big and much awaited bet, likely to alter the Indian economy’s landscape significantly. It has been estimated that the combined GST collection would exceed the individual collections of erstwhile excise and service tax collections which would contribute around 6 percent in GDP. The study has attempted to assess the selective stakeholders’ GST perceptions during the transition period of its rollover. It has framed two hypotheses and a conceptual model for executing the study. By adopting the cross-sectional research design and applying the survey strategy, it has gathered data from 170 sample respondents. Convenience sampling technique has been used for collecting the primary data. Reliability and validity of the tool has also been tested. Significant statistical results have indicated that the taxpayers’ attitudes and costs of compliance have probably effected the GST compliance which, in turn would curb inflations and evading the tax evasions. Limitations, practical implications and future research directions have been highlighted.

Keywords


GST, Tax Compliance, Tax Evasions, Survey, Inferential Statistics.

References