Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Subscription Access
Open Access Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Restricted Access Subscription Access

Members’ Perception on Information Professional Associations:The Case of Kenya Library Association and Kenya Association of Archivists and Records Managers


Affiliations
1 Kirinyaga University, Kerugoya, Kenya
2 Kenyatta University, Nairobi, Kenya
     

   Subscribe/Renew Journal


Purpose: This study assessed Kenya Library Association (KLA) and Kenya Association of Records Managers’ and Archivists (KARMA) members’ perceptions on the performance of their professional associations’ with a view to determining members’ level of participation in programmes/activities and challenges, if any.

Design/Methodology/Approach: The study used descriptive survey design to collect data from members and get their opinions, suggestions, and attitude about the KLA and KARMA using questionnaires and face-to-face interview. The study used purposeful sampling techniques to sample 80 KLA and 44 KARMA members out of a population of a population of 102 and 54, respectively. A pilot study of 10 respondents at the Association of Government Librarians (AGL) helped refine research instruments. Collected data was cleaned, coded and analysed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPPS) program to perform descriptive statistics such as means, percentages and frequency tables.

Findings: Findings showed that the majority of respondents’ agreed that the associations contribute immensely to the development of the information profession in Kenya. However, the study revealed 58 (60.4%) were neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with the programmes and activities of KLA and KARMA; they were not sure if the programmes met their expectations. The majority 72 (75%) were not involved in their associations programmes while 24 (25%) stated that they were involved. When asked to explain the response given, most of those who stated that they were not involved cited arbitrary decisions by the executive board and even misuse of resources by some officials.

Implication: This study has implications on the various programmes offered by KLA, KARMA and other information science professional organizations and how they are perceived by members.

Originality/Value: It was recommended that KLA and KARMA enhance members’ participation in decision making; increase enrolment of new members; improve communication from the secretariat and explore ways of cessation of in-house rivalry and in-fighting among officials.


Keywords

Academic and Research Libraries, Ghana, Library and Information Science Professionals, Staff Development.
Subscription Login to verify subscription
User
Notifications
Font Size


  • Ambira, “Creating professional unity for records managers and archivists: The experience of the Kenya Association of Records Managers and Archivists,” 2012. Retrieved from http://www.karma.co.ke/download/Comma_2012_1_11_Ambira.pdf.
  • S. Aslan, “Turkish Librarians’ Association: Today and tomorrow,” 61st IFLA Conference, Istanbul, Turkey, August 1995. Retrieved from: http://www.ifla.org/IV/ifla61/61-asls.htm
  • R. Bhatti, and T. M. Chohan, “Assessing the role of library associations in promoting research culture in LIS,” Library Philosophy and Practice (e-journal) Paper 839, 2012. Retrieved from http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1967&context =libphilprac
  • CLA, 2010. Membership survey, final report. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/commission/member survey.pdf
  • W. Fisher, “The value of professional associations,” Library Trends, vol. 46, no. 2, pp. 320-330, 1997. Retrieved from https://www.ideals.illinois.edu/bitstream/handle/2142/8157/librarytrendsv46i2i_opt.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y
  • D. G. Frank, “Activity in professional associations: The positive difference in a librarian’s career,” Library Trends, vol. 46, no. 2, pp. 307-319, 1997. Retrieved from https://www.ideals.illinois.edu/bitstream/handle/2142/8155/librarytrendsv46i2h_opt.pdf
  • S. Khan, and R. Bhatti, “Changing paradigms of global library associations and PLA: An appraisal,” Pakistan Library and Information Science Journal, vol. 41, no. 4, pp. 19-29, 2010. DOI: 10.1006/-plisjiilr
  • G. Loida, and L. Robin, “Expanding horizons: Developing the next generation of international professionals,” The Australian Library Journal, vol. 61, no. 1, pp. 16-21, 2012. DOI: 10.1057/k10488-013-0528-l
  • J. Lumpkin, “Why membership? Professional associations in the millennial age: A call to action through mentorship,” OLA Quarterly, vol. 21, no. 3, pp. 5-7, 2016. http://dx.doi.org/10.7710/1093-7374.1813
  • M. J. Madden, “Today’s UK professional association library and information service: Challenges and best practice,” ASLIB Proceedings, vol. 60, no. 6, pp. 556-569, 2008. DOI: 10.1108/00012530810924267
  • G. Markova, R. C. Ford, D. R. Dickson, and T. M. Bohn, “Professional associations and members’ benefits: What is in it for me?,” Non-profit Management and Leadership, vol. 23, no. 4, 2013. DOI: 10/nml.21076
  • H. Morrison, “Professional library & information associations should rise to the challenge of promoting open access and lead by example,” Library Hi Tech News, vol. 21, no. 4, pp. 8-10, 2004.
  • P. Muswazi, “The Swaziland library association: An appraisal,” The International Information & Library Review, vol. 30, no. 3, pp. 203-225, 2002. DOI: 10.1006/iilr.1998.0095
  • B. W. Namande, and C. F. Oyier, “Tapping indigenous knowledge to power the National Development Agenda: The indigenous knowledge resource centers approach,” The Maktaba Journal: A Journal of the Kenya Library Association, vol. 4, no. 1, 2015.
  • N. B. Ossai-Ugbah, “The role of professional library associations and institutions in facilitating access to information in Africa,” Academic Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies, vol. 2, no. 2, 2013. DOI: 10.5901/ajis.2013.v2n2p263
  • J. Otike, “The development of libraries in Kenya,” 1993. Retrieved from http://www.ku.ac.ke/schools/education/images/stories/research/development-of-libraries-in-kenya.pdf
  • J. M. Pemberton, “The professional association: Some basics,” Records Management Quarterly, vol. 28, no. 1, 1994. DOI: 10.1007/s10488-013-0528-y
  • S. Sunita, “Role of professional associations in agricultural innovation systems,” 2007. Retrieved from http://idl-bnc.idrc.ca/dspace/handle/10625/43504
  • V. K. Thomas, C. Satpathi, and J. N. Satpathi, “Emerging challenges in academic librarianship and role of library associations in professional updating,” Library Management, vol. 31, no. 8/9, pp. 594-609, 2010. DOI: 10.1108/01435121011093379
  • O. Ugbah, “The role of professional library associations and institutions in facilitating access to information in Africa,” Academic Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies, published by MCSER-CEMAS-Sapienza University of Rome, vol. 2, no 2, p. 263, July 2013.
  • UTICA College, Professional Associations, 2013. Retrieved from http://www.utica.edu/student/career/cs/Professional%20Association-website.pdf
  • J. A. C. Virgo, “The role of professional associations,” In C. R. McClure, and P. Hernon, (Eds.), Library and Information Science Research: Perspectives and Strategies for Improvement, pp. 189-196, Norwood, NJ: Ablex, 1991.
  • V. H. Vroom, Work and Motivation, San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1994. Retrieved from http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-078790

Abstract Views: 14

PDF Views: 0




  • Members’ Perception on Information Professional Associations:The Case of Kenya Library Association and Kenya Association of Archivists and Records Managers

Abstract Views: 14  |  PDF Views: 0

Authors

Sherry Odari
Kirinyaga University, Kerugoya, Kenya
Ben Namande
Kenyatta University, Nairobi, Kenya
Richard Otieno
Kirinyaga University, Kerugoya, Kenya
Grace Wangui
Kenyatta University, Nairobi, Kenya

Abstract


Purpose: This study assessed Kenya Library Association (KLA) and Kenya Association of Records Managers’ and Archivists (KARMA) members’ perceptions on the performance of their professional associations’ with a view to determining members’ level of participation in programmes/activities and challenges, if any.

Design/Methodology/Approach: The study used descriptive survey design to collect data from members and get their opinions, suggestions, and attitude about the KLA and KARMA using questionnaires and face-to-face interview. The study used purposeful sampling techniques to sample 80 KLA and 44 KARMA members out of a population of a population of 102 and 54, respectively. A pilot study of 10 respondents at the Association of Government Librarians (AGL) helped refine research instruments. Collected data was cleaned, coded and analysed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPPS) program to perform descriptive statistics such as means, percentages and frequency tables.

Findings: Findings showed that the majority of respondents’ agreed that the associations contribute immensely to the development of the information profession in Kenya. However, the study revealed 58 (60.4%) were neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with the programmes and activities of KLA and KARMA; they were not sure if the programmes met their expectations. The majority 72 (75%) were not involved in their associations programmes while 24 (25%) stated that they were involved. When asked to explain the response given, most of those who stated that they were not involved cited arbitrary decisions by the executive board and even misuse of resources by some officials.

Implication: This study has implications on the various programmes offered by KLA, KARMA and other information science professional organizations and how they are perceived by members.

Originality/Value: It was recommended that KLA and KARMA enhance members’ participation in decision making; increase enrolment of new members; improve communication from the secretariat and explore ways of cessation of in-house rivalry and in-fighting among officials.


Keywords


Academic and Research Libraries, Ghana, Library and Information Science Professionals, Staff Development.

References