Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Subscription Access
Open Access Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Restricted Access Subscription Access

Sleep Habits in First Year Medical Students at AIIMS Patna and its Impact on their Academic Performance


Affiliations
1 Department of Physiology AIIMS Patna, India
     

   Subscribe/Renew Journal


Introduction: - Sleep is an important biological necessity. Sleep timing and duration affects many functions of our body like, endocrine, metabolic, and neurological functions which are critical to the maintenance of individual health. College students often have erratic sleep schedules, poor sleep hygiene and poor sleep quality, which might affect their performance and cognitive functions. Objective: To characterize sleep habits and day and night habits in medical students using sleep quality assessment (PQSI scale) and Epworth sleepiness scale; to estimate how subjective sleep quality is associated with sleep problems in students; to estimate how academic progress is associated with subjective sleep quality. Materials and Method: A cross-sectional design- A self-administered paper questionnaire was administered of first-year through finalyear MBBS students. Students data on sleep quality was collected routinely as part of orientation program to assess students’ need in department of Physiology. Data on academic performance (first professional marks) was accessed from examination controller. Pittsburgh sleep quality index and Epworth sleepiness scale scoring was done. Results: A total of 90 medical students of AIIMS Patna, aged 16 to 25 years completed the study. Sleep habits of students shows an extreme range of 2 to 4 hrs minimum sleep to 7 to 9 hrs of maximum sleep. Maximum students take 6 to 7 hrs sleep. No statistically significant difference in academic performance between the different Epworth sleepiness score is observed. Negative correlation was obtained between the PSQI and grade average.

Keywords

Sleep Deprivation, Academic Performance, ESS Score, Global PQSI.
Subscription Login to verify subscription
User
Notifications
Font Size


  • Paula A and Päivi P-K; Sleep deprivation: Impact on cognitive performance; Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat. 2007 Oct; 3(5): 553–567.
  • Gregory B N J, Wesensten D R, Thorne M L, Thomas Helen C, Sing D P, Redmond et al; Patterns of performance degradation and restoration during sleep restriction and subsequent recovery: a sleep dose‐response study; Journal of sleep research; March 2003;12(1):1-12.
  • Healthy People. 2020, Office of Disease Health and Promotion, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Sleep health. http://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/topicsobjectives2020/overview.aspx?topicid=38. April 21, 2014.
  • Megan L Z , Matthew J. S, Matthew Song, Leanna M. K, Jingjing Qian, Paul W et al; Sleep Duration and Academic Performance Among Student Pharmacists; Am J Pharm Educ. 2015 Jun 25; 79(5): 63.
  • Ana L D. M, Denise B.F. M, Patrícia F. L &John F. A; The Relationships between Sleep-Wake Cycle and Academic Performance in Medical Students; Journal of Biological Rhythm Research; 2001; 32(2)
  • Veldi M, Aluoja A, Vasar V; Sleep quality and more common sleep-related problems in medical students; Sleep Med. 2005 May;6(3):269-75.
  • Bocca ML, Denise P. Total sleep deprivation effect on disengagement of spatial attention as assessed by saccadic eye movements. Clin Neurophysiol.2006; 117:894–9.
  • Blagrove M, Alexander C, Horne JA. The effects of chronic sleep reduction on the performance of cognitive tasks sensitive to sleep deprivation. App Cogn Psych.1995; 9:21–40.
  • Linde L, Bergstrom M. The effect of one night without sleep on problem-solving and immediate recall. Psychol Res. 1992; 54:127–36.
  • Harrison Y, Horne JA; One night of sleep loss impairs innovative thinking and flexible decision making.; Organ Behav Hum Decis Process. 1999 May; 78(2):128-45.
  • Dinges DF, Pack F, Williams K, Gillen KA, Powell JW, Ott GE, Aptowicz C, Pack AI; Cumulative sleepiness, mood disturbance, and psychomotor vigilance performance decrements during a week of sleep restricted to 4-5 hours per night.; Sleep. 1997 Apr; 20(4):267-77.
  • Kim DJ, Lee HP, Kim MS, et al. The effect of total sleep deprivation on cognitive functions in normal adult male subjects. Int J Neurosci. 2001; 109:127– 37.
  • Philibert I; Sleep loss and performance in residents and non-physicians: a meta-analytic examination; Sleep. 2005 Nov; 28(11):1392-402.
  • Maurice M. Ohayon, Epidemiological Overview of sleep Disorders in the General Population; Sleep Medicine Research (SMR) 2011; 2(1): 1-9
  • Rodrigues RN, Viegas CA, Abreu E Silva AA, Tavares P ; Daytime sleepiness and academic performance in medical students. Arq Neuropsiquiatr. 2002 Mar;60(1):6-11.
  • Jamaan M. Al-Zahrani , Khaled K. Aldossari, Imad Abdulmajeed , Sameer H. Al-Ghamdi , Abdullah M. Al-Shamrani and Nawaf S. Al-Qahtani ; Daytime Sleepiness and Academic Performance among Medical Students; Health science journal; 2016, 10(3):13.

Abstract Views: 18

PDF Views: 0




  • Sleep Habits in First Year Medical Students at AIIMS Patna and its Impact on their Academic Performance

Abstract Views: 18  |  PDF Views: 0

Authors

Yogesh Kumar
Department of Physiology AIIMS Patna, India
Pramita Dubey
Department of Physiology AIIMS Patna, India
Kamlesh Jha
Department of Physiology AIIMS Patna, India
Ramji Singh
Department of Physiology AIIMS Patna, India

Abstract


Introduction: - Sleep is an important biological necessity. Sleep timing and duration affects many functions of our body like, endocrine, metabolic, and neurological functions which are critical to the maintenance of individual health. College students often have erratic sleep schedules, poor sleep hygiene and poor sleep quality, which might affect their performance and cognitive functions. Objective: To characterize sleep habits and day and night habits in medical students using sleep quality assessment (PQSI scale) and Epworth sleepiness scale; to estimate how subjective sleep quality is associated with sleep problems in students; to estimate how academic progress is associated with subjective sleep quality. Materials and Method: A cross-sectional design- A self-administered paper questionnaire was administered of first-year through finalyear MBBS students. Students data on sleep quality was collected routinely as part of orientation program to assess students’ need in department of Physiology. Data on academic performance (first professional marks) was accessed from examination controller. Pittsburgh sleep quality index and Epworth sleepiness scale scoring was done. Results: A total of 90 medical students of AIIMS Patna, aged 16 to 25 years completed the study. Sleep habits of students shows an extreme range of 2 to 4 hrs minimum sleep to 7 to 9 hrs of maximum sleep. Maximum students take 6 to 7 hrs sleep. No statistically significant difference in academic performance between the different Epworth sleepiness score is observed. Negative correlation was obtained between the PSQI and grade average.

Keywords


Sleep Deprivation, Academic Performance, ESS Score, Global PQSI.

References