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A Study to Quantify & Compare Stress Levels & Lipid Profile in Working & Non- Working Women of Bangalore


Affiliations
1 Department of Physiology, Bangalore Medical College & Research Institute, K R Road, Bengaluru, India
     

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Background- Dyslipidemia is prevalent worldwide, mental stress & sedentary life style being major risk factors. Among working women lack of sleep, long working hours, commuting, meeting deadlines amount to physical stress that is part and parcel of job commitment. In non-working women there is availability of house help at hand & online facilities which reduce their physical activity. Many family issues & odd working hours may add to stress in them. Present study intended to quantify stress levels & compare it with lipid profile in working & non-working women.

Objective-

1) To quantify stress levels & lipid profile in working & non- working women.

2) Compare stress & lipid profile in working & non-working women.

Materials & Method- The study is done on 60 working & non- working women of Bangalore in age group of 20-40 years. Subjects with history of DM, HTN, CVD, thyroid disease were excluded. Informed consent was taken from all participants. After general examination & history taking -Stress score was assessed with perceived stress scale questionnaire. Lipid profile was assessed with 2ml venous sample after 8hrs of fasting. Students ‘t’ test is used for statistical analysis.

Results- Stress levels, LDL & Total cholesterol levels are significantly higher in working women. HDL levels were lower in same with P value of <0.05.

Conclusion- Dyslipidaemia found in working population may be due to increased stress score in them.


Keywords

Dyslipidaemia, PSS Score, Working Women, Stress.
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  • A Study to Quantify & Compare Stress Levels & Lipid Profile in Working & Non- Working Women of Bangalore

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Authors

Sneha G. Deshapande
Department of Physiology, Bangalore Medical College & Research Institute, K R Road, Bengaluru, India
B. Girija
Department of Physiology, Bangalore Medical College & Research Institute, K R Road, Bengaluru, India

Abstract


Background- Dyslipidemia is prevalent worldwide, mental stress & sedentary life style being major risk factors. Among working women lack of sleep, long working hours, commuting, meeting deadlines amount to physical stress that is part and parcel of job commitment. In non-working women there is availability of house help at hand & online facilities which reduce their physical activity. Many family issues & odd working hours may add to stress in them. Present study intended to quantify stress levels & compare it with lipid profile in working & non-working women.

Objective-

1) To quantify stress levels & lipid profile in working & non- working women.

2) Compare stress & lipid profile in working & non-working women.

Materials & Method- The study is done on 60 working & non- working women of Bangalore in age group of 20-40 years. Subjects with history of DM, HTN, CVD, thyroid disease were excluded. Informed consent was taken from all participants. After general examination & history taking -Stress score was assessed with perceived stress scale questionnaire. Lipid profile was assessed with 2ml venous sample after 8hrs of fasting. Students ‘t’ test is used for statistical analysis.

Results- Stress levels, LDL & Total cholesterol levels are significantly higher in working women. HDL levels were lower in same with P value of <0.05.

Conclusion- Dyslipidaemia found in working population may be due to increased stress score in them.


Keywords


Dyslipidaemia, PSS Score, Working Women, Stress.

References