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Study of Cognitive Evoked Potentials in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus


Affiliations
1 Department of Physiology, The Oxford Medical College Hospital and Research centre, Yadavanahalli, Attibele, Bangalore. Karnataka, India
2 Department of Physiology, Apollo Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Murakambattu, Chittoor, Andhra Pradesh, India
     

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Background: The completesyndrome of diabetes mellitus,related metabolic aberrations anddiabetic complications is posing a major threat in the 21st century. Cognitive dysfunction is a well known complication of diabetes which continues to be investigated.

Aims and Objectives: To evaluate the cognitive functions using electrophysiological (P300 latencies) tests in diabetics and non diabetics in the age group of 40 - 59 years with same gender proportion, to analyze whether cognition is affected in diabetics when compared to non diabetics and to know the usefulness of electrophysiological (P300latencies) tests in detecting subtle cognitive changes.

Materials and Method: The study was conducted on 50 diabetics and 50 non diabetics aged between 40 and 59 years. Cognition was assessed using P300 potential.The evoked potential data analysis was done using Student unpaired T test to compare the mean of two groups.

Results: The absolute peak latencies of P3 component of endogenous cognitive evoked potentials was significantly prolonged among diabetics (334.8 + 20.8) as compared to controls (285.7 + 14.9). There was no statistically significant difference between groups when analyzed for N2 in Czand Fz.

Conclusion: This study identifies prevalence of cognitive dysfunction in diabetic patients when assessed using electrophysiological tests.Good cognitive function is critical to safely manage diabetesand draws attention to various challenges in their management. Clinicians should consider screening for cognitive function in diabetics using P300, as it is effective in detecting subtle changes much before their clinical manifestation.


Keywords

Diabetes Mellitus, Cognition, Cognitive Evoked Potential, Event Related Potentials, NIDDM, P300.
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  • Study of Cognitive Evoked Potentials in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

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Authors

A. Sindhuja
Department of Physiology, The Oxford Medical College Hospital and Research centre, Yadavanahalli, Attibele, Bangalore. Karnataka, India
R. Ramya
Department of Physiology, Apollo Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Murakambattu, Chittoor, Andhra Pradesh, India

Abstract


Background: The completesyndrome of diabetes mellitus,related metabolic aberrations anddiabetic complications is posing a major threat in the 21st century. Cognitive dysfunction is a well known complication of diabetes which continues to be investigated.

Aims and Objectives: To evaluate the cognitive functions using electrophysiological (P300 latencies) tests in diabetics and non diabetics in the age group of 40 - 59 years with same gender proportion, to analyze whether cognition is affected in diabetics when compared to non diabetics and to know the usefulness of electrophysiological (P300latencies) tests in detecting subtle cognitive changes.

Materials and Method: The study was conducted on 50 diabetics and 50 non diabetics aged between 40 and 59 years. Cognition was assessed using P300 potential.The evoked potential data analysis was done using Student unpaired T test to compare the mean of two groups.

Results: The absolute peak latencies of P3 component of endogenous cognitive evoked potentials was significantly prolonged among diabetics (334.8 + 20.8) as compared to controls (285.7 + 14.9). There was no statistically significant difference between groups when analyzed for N2 in Czand Fz.

Conclusion: This study identifies prevalence of cognitive dysfunction in diabetic patients when assessed using electrophysiological tests.Good cognitive function is critical to safely manage diabetesand draws attention to various challenges in their management. Clinicians should consider screening for cognitive function in diabetics using P300, as it is effective in detecting subtle changes much before their clinical manifestation.


Keywords


Diabetes Mellitus, Cognition, Cognitive Evoked Potential, Event Related Potentials, NIDDM, P300.

References