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A Comparitive Study:Autonomic Functions in Cerebral Palsy Individuals and Their Siblings


Affiliations
1 Department of Physiology, Bowring and lady Curzon medical college and research Institute, Bangalore, Karnataka, India
2 Department of Physiology, Vijayanagar Institute of Medical Sciences, Ballari, Karnataka, India
     

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Introduction: It is defined as an “umbrella term covering a group of non-progressive, but often changing, motor impairment syndromes secondary to lesions or anomalies of the brain arising in the early stages of its development”1 primarily leading to a disorder of movement and posture. Objective: To assess autonomic functions in cerebral palsy individuals and their siblings. Method: Twenty cerebral palsy and sibling volunteers with no neurological damage were recruited for the study. Heart rate variability was used to assess the autonomic function. HRV was recorded in supine position for 5 minutes under quiet, calm conditions. Time domain parameters and frequency domain parameters were analyzed. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in any of the HRV parameters. There was no significant difference in HRV parameters in children with CP and healthy children indicating a normal sympatho-vagal balance. Conclusion: The presence of normal sympatho vagal balance in CP predicts that patients with CP have the same predilection as the general population to abnormalities associated with sympatho-vagal balance.

Keywords

Cerebral Palsy, HRV, Sympathetic Activity, Parasympathetic Activity, Sympatho Vagal Balance.
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  • A Comparitive Study:Autonomic Functions in Cerebral Palsy Individuals and Their Siblings

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Authors

P. Sowmya
Department of Physiology, Bowring and lady Curzon medical college and research Institute, Bangalore, Karnataka, India
J. Govindaraj
Department of Physiology, Vijayanagar Institute of Medical Sciences, Ballari, Karnataka, India

Abstract


Introduction: It is defined as an “umbrella term covering a group of non-progressive, but often changing, motor impairment syndromes secondary to lesions or anomalies of the brain arising in the early stages of its development”1 primarily leading to a disorder of movement and posture. Objective: To assess autonomic functions in cerebral palsy individuals and their siblings. Method: Twenty cerebral palsy and sibling volunteers with no neurological damage were recruited for the study. Heart rate variability was used to assess the autonomic function. HRV was recorded in supine position for 5 minutes under quiet, calm conditions. Time domain parameters and frequency domain parameters were analyzed. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in any of the HRV parameters. There was no significant difference in HRV parameters in children with CP and healthy children indicating a normal sympatho-vagal balance. Conclusion: The presence of normal sympatho vagal balance in CP predicts that patients with CP have the same predilection as the general population to abnormalities associated with sympatho-vagal balance.

Keywords


Cerebral Palsy, HRV, Sympathetic Activity, Parasympathetic Activity, Sympatho Vagal Balance.

References