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Physical Factors Influencing FVC in Indian Adult Males


Affiliations
1 Department of Physiology, Gadag Institute of Medical Sciences, Gadag, Karnataka, India
     

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Background: Pulmonary function tests are widely used as a valuable diagnostic tool in detecting and diagnosing various respiratory disorders like COPD, they also play an important role in monitoring therapy effectiveness and course of the disease. Normative values of pulmonary functions of healthy population are affected by different geographic, ethnic, climatic and demographic factors. The most important determining factors of Vital capacity in an individual are anthropometric factors such as age, sex, height, weight, body mass index (BMI) and body surface area (BSA)

Aims and Objectives: The aim of the present study was to find the correlation between Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) and anthropometric measurements like height, weight, body mass index (BMI) and body surface area (BSA) in Indian adult males.

Materials and Method: Fifty healthy adult males were randomly selected for the study. Ethical clearance was taken from the Institutional Ethical Committee. The physical factors namely height, weight, body mass index (BMI), and body surface area (BSA) were measured. FVC was recorded by using computerized spirometer. The correlation between the various physical factors and FVC was done using Pearson’s correlation.

Results: Height, weight and body surface area showed significant positive correlation with FVC. However height showed the strongest correlation (r = 0.5807), followed by BSA (r = 0.531) and lastly weight (r = 0.422). However the correlation of BMI with FVC was not statistically significant.

Conclusion: The present study showed that body height, body surface area and body weight are important determinant of FVC in Indian adult males, with height being the most important determinant.


Keywords

FVC, Height, Weight, BMI, Body Surface Area.
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  • Physical Factors Influencing FVC in Indian Adult Males

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Authors

D. M. Chandrashekhar
Department of Physiology, Gadag Institute of Medical Sciences, Gadag, Karnataka, India
Anandkumar
Department of Physiology, Gadag Institute of Medical Sciences, Gadag, Karnataka, India
M. K. Jayalakshmi
Department of Physiology, Gadag Institute of Medical Sciences, Gadag, Karnataka, India
Prashanth Babu
Department of Physiology, Gadag Institute of Medical Sciences, Gadag, Karnataka, India

Abstract


Background: Pulmonary function tests are widely used as a valuable diagnostic tool in detecting and diagnosing various respiratory disorders like COPD, they also play an important role in monitoring therapy effectiveness and course of the disease. Normative values of pulmonary functions of healthy population are affected by different geographic, ethnic, climatic and demographic factors. The most important determining factors of Vital capacity in an individual are anthropometric factors such as age, sex, height, weight, body mass index (BMI) and body surface area (BSA)

Aims and Objectives: The aim of the present study was to find the correlation between Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) and anthropometric measurements like height, weight, body mass index (BMI) and body surface area (BSA) in Indian adult males.

Materials and Method: Fifty healthy adult males were randomly selected for the study. Ethical clearance was taken from the Institutional Ethical Committee. The physical factors namely height, weight, body mass index (BMI), and body surface area (BSA) were measured. FVC was recorded by using computerized spirometer. The correlation between the various physical factors and FVC was done using Pearson’s correlation.

Results: Height, weight and body surface area showed significant positive correlation with FVC. However height showed the strongest correlation (r = 0.5807), followed by BSA (r = 0.531) and lastly weight (r = 0.422). However the correlation of BMI with FVC was not statistically significant.

Conclusion: The present study showed that body height, body surface area and body weight are important determinant of FVC in Indian adult males, with height being the most important determinant.


Keywords


FVC, Height, Weight, BMI, Body Surface Area.

References