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Impact of Obesity on Castelli’s Risk Index I and II, in Young Adult Females


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1 Department of Physiology, Gadag Institute of Medical Sciences, Gadag, Karnataka, India
     

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Background: Obesity is one of today’s most blatantly visible, yet most neglected, public health problems. In 2016, 39% of adults worldwide were overweight. Fueled by economic growth, urbanization, an increasingly sedentary lifestyle, and a nutritional transition to processed foods and high calorie diets over the last 30 years, many countries have witnessed the prevalence of obesity in its citizens double, and even quadruple. Obesity especially visceral obesity causes insulin resistance and is associated with dyslipidemia, impaired glucose metabolism, and hypertension all of which exacerbate atherosclerosis, and are risk factors for developing cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The primary dyslipidemia related to obesity is characterized by increased total cholesterol (TC), decreased high density lipoprotein (HDL) levels and abnormal low density lipoprotein (LDL) composition. Lipoprotein ratios are becoming increasingly popular as a way to predict atherosclerosis and CVD.

Aims and Objectives: The present study was undertaken to assess the impact of overweight/obesity on lipid profile parameters and lipoprotein ratios- Castelli’s Risk Index I and II, in young adult females.

Materials and Method: The present study was conducted in KIMS, Hubli, the study and its conduct was cleared by the Ethical committee. Sixty apparently healthy young females were selected for the study. Health status and other personal data were obtained via comprehensive questionnaire. The subjects were divided into two groups based on BMI; Healthy (BMI 18.5-24.99) and Overweight (BMI > 25). Lipid profile was evaluated and lipoprotein ratios calculated. Comparison between the two groups was done using students’ t-test.

Results: Values for Castelli’s Risk Index I & II were found to be significantly higher in the overweight group compared to the control group.

Conclusion: Obesity leads to an unfavorable lipid pattern and raises values of both Castelli’s Risk Index I & II.


Keywords

Obesity, Castelli’s Risk Index I & II, Lipid Profile, Lipoprotein Ratios.
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  • Impact of Obesity on Castelli’s Risk Index I and II, in Young Adult Females

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Authors

D. M. Chandrashekhar
Department of Physiology, Gadag Institute of Medical Sciences, Gadag, Karnataka, India
Anandkumar
Department of Physiology, Gadag Institute of Medical Sciences, Gadag, Karnataka, India
M. K. Jayalakshmi
Department of Physiology, Gadag Institute of Medical Sciences, Gadag, Karnataka, India
Prashanth Babu
Department of Physiology, Gadag Institute of Medical Sciences, Gadag, Karnataka, India

Abstract


Background: Obesity is one of today’s most blatantly visible, yet most neglected, public health problems. In 2016, 39% of adults worldwide were overweight. Fueled by economic growth, urbanization, an increasingly sedentary lifestyle, and a nutritional transition to processed foods and high calorie diets over the last 30 years, many countries have witnessed the prevalence of obesity in its citizens double, and even quadruple. Obesity especially visceral obesity causes insulin resistance and is associated with dyslipidemia, impaired glucose metabolism, and hypertension all of which exacerbate atherosclerosis, and are risk factors for developing cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The primary dyslipidemia related to obesity is characterized by increased total cholesterol (TC), decreased high density lipoprotein (HDL) levels and abnormal low density lipoprotein (LDL) composition. Lipoprotein ratios are becoming increasingly popular as a way to predict atherosclerosis and CVD.

Aims and Objectives: The present study was undertaken to assess the impact of overweight/obesity on lipid profile parameters and lipoprotein ratios- Castelli’s Risk Index I and II, in young adult females.

Materials and Method: The present study was conducted in KIMS, Hubli, the study and its conduct was cleared by the Ethical committee. Sixty apparently healthy young females were selected for the study. Health status and other personal data were obtained via comprehensive questionnaire. The subjects were divided into two groups based on BMI; Healthy (BMI 18.5-24.99) and Overweight (BMI > 25). Lipid profile was evaluated and lipoprotein ratios calculated. Comparison between the two groups was done using students’ t-test.

Results: Values for Castelli’s Risk Index I & II were found to be significantly higher in the overweight group compared to the control group.

Conclusion: Obesity leads to an unfavorable lipid pattern and raises values of both Castelli’s Risk Index I & II.


Keywords


Obesity, Castelli’s Risk Index I & II, Lipid Profile, Lipoprotein Ratios.

References