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The Relationship Between Leadership Behaviors and Commitment to Organizational Team in An Academic Institution


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1 School of Business and Management, University of the Commonwealth Caribbean 17 Worthington Avenue, Kingston, Jamaica
     

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The present study investigated the relationship between leadership behaviors and commitment to organizational team in an academic institution. Data were collected from 27 middle level/upper level managers in a higher educational institution through online survey using two reliable and validated instruments. This online survey was made using Google forms, the link of which was sent out to all the upper/middle managerial level employees of the particular educational institution. In addition, hard copies of the survey were also given to those who requested them. It was found that middle/upper level managers who exhibited transformational leadership behaviors appear to have a greater positive relationship in terms of degree of commitment to their teams, when compared to those who exhibited transactional leadership behaviors. Results may have strong implications in crafting suitable leadership development and management training programs in terms of understanding one's dominating cognitive framework. Because the leadership process usually involves a particular leader's personality and behaviors, the subordinate's perception of that leader, and the context within which the relationship occurs.

Keywords

Organizational Commitment, Organizational Performance, Transactional Leadership Behaviors.
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  • The Relationship Between Leadership Behaviors and Commitment to Organizational Team in An Academic Institution

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Authors

David Bennett
School of Business and Management, University of the Commonwealth Caribbean 17 Worthington Avenue, Kingston, Jamaica

Abstract


The present study investigated the relationship between leadership behaviors and commitment to organizational team in an academic institution. Data were collected from 27 middle level/upper level managers in a higher educational institution through online survey using two reliable and validated instruments. This online survey was made using Google forms, the link of which was sent out to all the upper/middle managerial level employees of the particular educational institution. In addition, hard copies of the survey were also given to those who requested them. It was found that middle/upper level managers who exhibited transformational leadership behaviors appear to have a greater positive relationship in terms of degree of commitment to their teams, when compared to those who exhibited transactional leadership behaviors. Results may have strong implications in crafting suitable leadership development and management training programs in terms of understanding one's dominating cognitive framework. Because the leadership process usually involves a particular leader's personality and behaviors, the subordinate's perception of that leader, and the context within which the relationship occurs.

Keywords


Organizational Commitment, Organizational Performance, Transactional Leadership Behaviors.

References