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Status and Diversity of Avifauna in Sultanpur National Park in Gurgaon District-Haryana, India


Affiliations
1 Govt. Senior Secondary School, Garhi Jattan, Karnal, Haryana, India
2 Department of Zoology, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra, India
     

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The present research work was carried out during September 2009 to March 2014 to investigate the avian biodiversity of Sultanpur National Park in Haryana, India. In all, 161 species of birds belonging to 16 orders and 47 families were observed from the Sultanpur National Park. Out of these 161 species of Birds, 99 species of birds were Resident, 41 species winter migratory, 11 species local migratory and 10 species of birds were summer migratory. The present study revealed that 155 species of birds were Least Concern, two species of birds like Saras Crane (Grus antigone) and White-necked Stork (Ciconia episcopus) were vulnerable and four species of birds like Black-necked Stork (Ephippiorhynchus asiaticus), Painted Stork (Mycteria leucocephala), Darter (Anhinga melanogaster)and Oriental White Ibis (Threskiornis melanocephalus) were near Threatened as per IUCN Red Data Book. The present studies tempt to suggest that Sultanpur National Park need to be further strengthened by ensuring water throughout the year in the accompaniment of massive implantation of Ficus religiosa, Ficus bengalensis, Azadirachta indica, Acasia niloticaand Mangifera indica trees to serve as the best roosting and breeding ground for Painted Stork, White-necked Stork, Black-necked Stork and platforms may be developed to encourage proliferation of Saras Crane and White-necked Stork.

Keywords

Sultanpur National Park, Deteriorated Habitat, Habitat Rejuvenation, Eco-Tourism.
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About The Authors

Tirshem Kumar Kaushik
Govt. Senior Secondary School, Garhi Jattan, Karnal, Haryana
India

Rohtash Chand Gupta
Department of Zoology, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra
India


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  • Status and Diversity of Avifauna in Sultanpur National Park in Gurgaon District-Haryana, India

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Authors

Tirshem Kumar Kaushik
Govt. Senior Secondary School, Garhi Jattan, Karnal, Haryana, India
Rohtash Chand Gupta
Department of Zoology, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra, India

Abstract


The present research work was carried out during September 2009 to March 2014 to investigate the avian biodiversity of Sultanpur National Park in Haryana, India. In all, 161 species of birds belonging to 16 orders and 47 families were observed from the Sultanpur National Park. Out of these 161 species of Birds, 99 species of birds were Resident, 41 species winter migratory, 11 species local migratory and 10 species of birds were summer migratory. The present study revealed that 155 species of birds were Least Concern, two species of birds like Saras Crane (Grus antigone) and White-necked Stork (Ciconia episcopus) were vulnerable and four species of birds like Black-necked Stork (Ephippiorhynchus asiaticus), Painted Stork (Mycteria leucocephala), Darter (Anhinga melanogaster)and Oriental White Ibis (Threskiornis melanocephalus) were near Threatened as per IUCN Red Data Book. The present studies tempt to suggest that Sultanpur National Park need to be further strengthened by ensuring water throughout the year in the accompaniment of massive implantation of Ficus religiosa, Ficus bengalensis, Azadirachta indica, Acasia niloticaand Mangifera indica trees to serve as the best roosting and breeding ground for Painted Stork, White-necked Stork, Black-necked Stork and platforms may be developed to encourage proliferation of Saras Crane and White-necked Stork.

Keywords


Sultanpur National Park, Deteriorated Habitat, Habitat Rejuvenation, Eco-Tourism.

References