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Psychological Contract and its Implications on Faculty Retention in Uttarakhand Higher Education Sector


Affiliations
1 Graphic Era Ubiversity, Dehradun, India
2 IMS, Ghaziabad, India
     

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An organization comprises of a structure (division of work into units and foundation of linkages among units), frameworks (particular methods for dealing with the significant elements of the association) and standards (acknowledged examples of conduct), qualities, and conventions. Every organization functions for the survival, growth and prosperity. While the survival depends upon workforce and growth depends upon competent workforce; prosperity depends upon committed and competent workforce. The number of employees is the measure of workforce, number of employees working for long is the measure of committed workforce. Employees may be found working in the organization following the instructions and obeying rules and regulations; but that does not guarantee the engagement of the employees. Administration need to ensure that the adherence to instruction by employees is not coupled with resistance. Employees may be found to be working having grudges or grievance against the administration and ceteris paribus will always be looking after a new job. Adherence by employees can also be mere fulfillment of compliance in exchange of the salary. It is only when the employees are involved with commitment, we can say that organization has the engaged employee to steer the organization on the path of growth and prosperity.

The aim of this study was to gain insight into the relationship employee engagement has with the psychological contracts. The empirical results suggest that there is a statically significant relationship between psychological contract fulfillment and employee engagement . Based on insights generated from this research, it can be concluded that overreliance on explicit contracts and ignorance of implicit psychological contracts could lead to faulty decision-making by employers. Leaders would be well served to remember that employees are people, and not just members of their organizations. The administration has to ensure that the employees working in the organization are engaged i.e. working with commitment rather than merely fulfilling the compliance and / or resistance.


Keywords

Psychological Contract, Employee Engagement.
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  • Psychological Contract and its Implications on Faculty Retention in Uttarakhand Higher Education Sector

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Authors

Shilpi Mittal
Graphic Era Ubiversity, Dehradun, India
Amar Kumar Mishra
IMS, Ghaziabad, India

Abstract


An organization comprises of a structure (division of work into units and foundation of linkages among units), frameworks (particular methods for dealing with the significant elements of the association) and standards (acknowledged examples of conduct), qualities, and conventions. Every organization functions for the survival, growth and prosperity. While the survival depends upon workforce and growth depends upon competent workforce; prosperity depends upon committed and competent workforce. The number of employees is the measure of workforce, number of employees working for long is the measure of committed workforce. Employees may be found working in the organization following the instructions and obeying rules and regulations; but that does not guarantee the engagement of the employees. Administration need to ensure that the adherence to instruction by employees is not coupled with resistance. Employees may be found to be working having grudges or grievance against the administration and ceteris paribus will always be looking after a new job. Adherence by employees can also be mere fulfillment of compliance in exchange of the salary. It is only when the employees are involved with commitment, we can say that organization has the engaged employee to steer the organization on the path of growth and prosperity.

The aim of this study was to gain insight into the relationship employee engagement has with the psychological contracts. The empirical results suggest that there is a statically significant relationship between psychological contract fulfillment and employee engagement . Based on insights generated from this research, it can be concluded that overreliance on explicit contracts and ignorance of implicit psychological contracts could lead to faulty decision-making by employers. Leaders would be well served to remember that employees are people, and not just members of their organizations. The administration has to ensure that the employees working in the organization are engaged i.e. working with commitment rather than merely fulfilling the compliance and / or resistance.


Keywords


Psychological Contract, Employee Engagement.

References