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The Effect of Coaching Behavior on Player’s Satisfaction in the Case of Ethiopian Soccer Players: Review of Literature


Affiliations
1 Andhra University Physical Education Department, Visakhapatnam, India
2 Director Of Physical Education, Andhra University Visakhapatnam, India
3 Research Scholar Andhra University, Department Of Physical Education, India
     

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Both researchers and practitioners agree the development of athletic talent is dependent upon quality coaching (Bloom, 1985; Cote, Baker & Abernathy, 2003). Likewise, the quality is often determined by how coaches behave in all aspects of their sport. Coaching behaviors in practice, at games, and away from the sport have strong influences on players (Murray, 2006) and can impact both players' performances and continued participation. As early as 1978, Chelladurai and Carron wrote that sport performance would be positively affected if coaches adapted their behaviors to comply with athletes' preferences Iso-Ahola and Hatfield (1986) noted that player satisfaction in sport is often a direct result of coaching behavior, not successful team performance. They further noted that positive coaching behavior was a key factor in many aspects of athletic performance. Stewat (1993) found that coaches exhibiting positive behaviors were remembered by their athletes as being strong role models Kenow and Williams (1999) stated that surprisingly little research had been reported on the consequences of coaching behaviors and its effectiveness. In their study, they found players who perceived their coaches as being more compatible, evaluated the coaches' communication ability and player-support levels more favorably. Conversely, if athletes disagreed with the coachers goals, personality, and/or beliefs, some of the psychological needs of the players were not met. That failure often resulted in frustration and a loss of self-concept by the player. During this same period, Newton and Duda ( 1 999)m stated that athletes' perception of coach behavior was the foundation of their evaluation of their athletic environment. The more positive the athletes perceived their coaches' behaviors, the more positive was their athletic experience.

Keywords

Coaching behavior, Performance, Satisfaction, Coach, Athlete.
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  • The Effect of Coaching Behavior on Player’s Satisfaction in the Case of Ethiopian Soccer Players: Review of Literature

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Authors

C. Reddy
Andhra University Physical Education Department, Visakhapatnam, India
Seyam M. Babu
Director Of Physical Education, Andhra University Visakhapatnam, India
Wegene Waltenegus Kidane
Research Scholar Andhra University, Department Of Physical Education, India

Abstract


Both researchers and practitioners agree the development of athletic talent is dependent upon quality coaching (Bloom, 1985; Cote, Baker & Abernathy, 2003). Likewise, the quality is often determined by how coaches behave in all aspects of their sport. Coaching behaviors in practice, at games, and away from the sport have strong influences on players (Murray, 2006) and can impact both players' performances and continued participation. As early as 1978, Chelladurai and Carron wrote that sport performance would be positively affected if coaches adapted their behaviors to comply with athletes' preferences Iso-Ahola and Hatfield (1986) noted that player satisfaction in sport is often a direct result of coaching behavior, not successful team performance. They further noted that positive coaching behavior was a key factor in many aspects of athletic performance. Stewat (1993) found that coaches exhibiting positive behaviors were remembered by their athletes as being strong role models Kenow and Williams (1999) stated that surprisingly little research had been reported on the consequences of coaching behaviors and its effectiveness. In their study, they found players who perceived their coaches as being more compatible, evaluated the coaches' communication ability and player-support levels more favorably. Conversely, if athletes disagreed with the coachers goals, personality, and/or beliefs, some of the psychological needs of the players were not met. That failure often resulted in frustration and a loss of self-concept by the player. During this same period, Newton and Duda ( 1 999)m stated that athletes' perception of coach behavior was the foundation of their evaluation of their athletic environment. The more positive the athletes perceived their coaches' behaviors, the more positive was their athletic experience.

Keywords


Coaching behavior, Performance, Satisfaction, Coach, Athlete.

References