Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Subscription Access
Open Access Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Restricted Access Subscription Access

Fertilizer Scenario in India


Affiliations
1 Department of Economics, Government Arts College Udumalpet, Tamilnadu, India
     

   Subscribe/Renew Journal


India made impressive gains in the field of agricultural production and harvested a record in food grains production of 230 million tonnes during 2007-2008. Introduction of HYV‟s and hybrid varieties brought optimism about fertilizer response superiority of modern varieties. The total nutrient consumption (N+P2O5 +K2O) touched level of 264lakh million tonnes during 2009-10, the highest so far. Since the rain fed areas, which constitute 70% of the cultivated areas, consume only 20% of the total fertilizers, the government has been taking steps in recent years to increase the consumption of fertilizers in these areas. Even though India is the third largest fertilizer user, average rate of nutrient application is only 85 kg/ha. The use of fertilizers is affected by a number of factors like irrigation, high yielding variety seeds, size of the farm credit etc. Increased area under high yielding varieties led to increased food grains production. With effect from 1 April 2003, the Government implemented the “New Fertilizer Policy”, which allowed urea manufacturers to market initially 25 percent and subsequently 50 percent of their production outside the purview of distribution control. The efficiency of fertilizer use could be improved through fertilization practices that include an application of macronutrients and micronutrients according to crop requirements. An adequate supply of credit for farmers and distributors is necessary to ensure the availability of fertilizers when and where they are required.

Keywords

No keywords
Subscription Login to verify subscription
User
Notifications
Font Size


  • Desai, G.M., “Issues and Themes in Growth of Fertilizer use in India”, Dr. V.S. Panse Memorial Lecture, Indian Society of Agricultural Statistics, 1990.
  • Dr.Kayarkanni (2000), “Fertilizer Use on Three Major Crops (Paddy, Sugarcane, Cotton) in Madurai District of Tamil Nadu”, Agricultural Situation in India, August 46(7).
  • Department of Fertilizers, Government of India.
  • Economic Survey, 2010-11.
  • Fertilizer Statistics- 2006-2007.
  • Kumar, P., and Mruthyunjaya, (1994), “Productivity and Sources of Growth in Rice: India”, Economic and Political Weekly, 19, 53, PP: A183-A188.
  • Motsara, M.R. 2002... Fert. News, 47(8): 15–21.
  • Singh, M.V. Evaluation of current micronutrient stocks in different agro ecological zones of India for sustainable crops production. Fert. News, 42(2): 25–42. 2001.
  • Swaminathan, M.S, (2002), “Agrarian Prosperity-In our Quest For Quality Produce.”, The Hindu-Survey of Indian Agriculture, PP:9-13.
  • Thiyagarajan, T.M.,(2002), “Soil Health and its Care For Sustainable Agricultural Production”, Agriculture 2002, Tamilnadu Agricultural University, PP:130-149.

Abstract Views: 119

PDF Views: 0




  • Fertilizer Scenario in India

Abstract Views: 119  |  PDF Views: 0

Authors

P. Mala
Department of Economics, Government Arts College Udumalpet, Tamilnadu, India

Abstract


India made impressive gains in the field of agricultural production and harvested a record in food grains production of 230 million tonnes during 2007-2008. Introduction of HYV‟s and hybrid varieties brought optimism about fertilizer response superiority of modern varieties. The total nutrient consumption (N+P2O5 +K2O) touched level of 264lakh million tonnes during 2009-10, the highest so far. Since the rain fed areas, which constitute 70% of the cultivated areas, consume only 20% of the total fertilizers, the government has been taking steps in recent years to increase the consumption of fertilizers in these areas. Even though India is the third largest fertilizer user, average rate of nutrient application is only 85 kg/ha. The use of fertilizers is affected by a number of factors like irrigation, high yielding variety seeds, size of the farm credit etc. Increased area under high yielding varieties led to increased food grains production. With effect from 1 April 2003, the Government implemented the “New Fertilizer Policy”, which allowed urea manufacturers to market initially 25 percent and subsequently 50 percent of their production outside the purview of distribution control. The efficiency of fertilizer use could be improved through fertilization practices that include an application of macronutrients and micronutrients according to crop requirements. An adequate supply of credit for farmers and distributors is necessary to ensure the availability of fertilizers when and where they are required.

Keywords


No keywords

References