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Support Staff in the Caribbean:How Job Satisfaction is Related to Organizational Commitment?


Affiliations
1 School of Business and Management, University of the Commonwealth Caribbean, 17 Worthington Avenue, Kingston, Jamaica
2 Dissertation Methodologist and Dissertation Chair Grand Canyon University, Arizona, USA, United States
     

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The purpose of this quantitative, correlational research was to examine to what degree a relationship existed between job satisfaction and organizational commitment among support staff (cafeteria employees) in a higher educational institution in the Caribbean. The study included a sample of 27 full-time cafeteria employees who worked in a private for profit higher educational institution in the Caribbean. Study participants completed two survey instruments, the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire (MSQ) short form and the Klein Unidimensional Target-free (KUT) scale. The questionnaires were in the form of hard copies. The Spearman rank order coefficient was used to measure the strength and direction of the relationship between the variables of interestjob satisfaction and organizational commitment. Results found that there was a moderate significant positive relationship between overall job satisfaction and overall organizational commitment among cafeteria employees at the for profit higher educational institution.

Keywords

Job Satisfaction, Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire, Organizational Commitment.
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  • Support Staff in the Caribbean:How Job Satisfaction is Related to Organizational Commitment?

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Authors

David Bennett
School of Business and Management, University of the Commonwealth Caribbean, 17 Worthington Avenue, Kingston, Jamaica
Laurel Stanley
Dissertation Methodologist and Dissertation Chair Grand Canyon University, Arizona, USA, United States

Abstract


The purpose of this quantitative, correlational research was to examine to what degree a relationship existed between job satisfaction and organizational commitment among support staff (cafeteria employees) in a higher educational institution in the Caribbean. The study included a sample of 27 full-time cafeteria employees who worked in a private for profit higher educational institution in the Caribbean. Study participants completed two survey instruments, the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire (MSQ) short form and the Klein Unidimensional Target-free (KUT) scale. The questionnaires were in the form of hard copies. The Spearman rank order coefficient was used to measure the strength and direction of the relationship between the variables of interestjob satisfaction and organizational commitment. Results found that there was a moderate significant positive relationship between overall job satisfaction and overall organizational commitment among cafeteria employees at the for profit higher educational institution.

Keywords


Job Satisfaction, Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire, Organizational Commitment.

References





DOI: https://doi.org/10.15614/ijpp%2F2019%2Fv10i2%2F185295