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Trunk Balance is Important to an Exercise Routine in Patients with Specific Low Back Pain


Affiliations
1 Maharishi Markandeshwar Institute of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation, Mullana, Ambala, India
2 Maharishi Markandeshwar Institute of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation, Mullana, Ambala, American Samoa
     

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Objective: The aim of the study is to investigate whether trunk balance exercises show any reduction in pain and disability and improvement in flexibility in individuals with specific low back pain.

Background: The majority of exercises focusing on restoring lumbopelvic stability propose tar-geting the feedforward control of the lumbopelvic region. Less attention has been paid to feedback control during balance adjustments. Stability of the lumbar intervertebral segments is provided by osseous and ligamentous restraints. However, without the influence of neuromuscular control, the segments are inherently unstable upon the movement. Therefore, a combination of muscle forces and passive structures are utilized to dynamically stabilize the spine.

Study design: Randomized Clinical Trial Setting: MMIPR, Mullana (Ambala)

Method: Thirty patients were randomly allocated to 2 different groups. The experimental group performed trunk balance exercises in addition to conventional physiotherapy. The control group get only conventional physiotherapy. The primary outcome measures were numeric pain rating scale (NPRS), Roland and Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) and Modified Schober's test.

Results: A significant difference in scores on the NPRS (p = 0.002), RMDQ (p = .04) and trunk flexibility (p = 0.00) were found in favor of the experimental treatment. Trunk balance exercise group (Group A) showed a significant difference in outcome measures as compared to conventional group (Group B).

Conclusion: Statistically and clinically the results suggests that trunk balance exercises are more effective than conventional treatment in reducing pain and disability and increasing flexibility in specific low back pain patients.


Keywords

LBP, Lumbar Spine, Stabilization, NPRS, RMDQ
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  • Trunk Balance is Important to an Exercise Routine in Patients with Specific Low Back Pain

Abstract Views: 289  |  PDF Views: 0

Authors

Heena Lalit
Maharishi Markandeshwar Institute of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation, Mullana, Ambala, India
Monika Moitra
Maharishi Markandeshwar Institute of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation, Mullana, Ambala, India
Manu Goyal
Maharishi Markandeshwar Institute of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation, Mullana, Ambala, American Samoa

Abstract


Objective: The aim of the study is to investigate whether trunk balance exercises show any reduction in pain and disability and improvement in flexibility in individuals with specific low back pain.

Background: The majority of exercises focusing on restoring lumbopelvic stability propose tar-geting the feedforward control of the lumbopelvic region. Less attention has been paid to feedback control during balance adjustments. Stability of the lumbar intervertebral segments is provided by osseous and ligamentous restraints. However, without the influence of neuromuscular control, the segments are inherently unstable upon the movement. Therefore, a combination of muscle forces and passive structures are utilized to dynamically stabilize the spine.

Study design: Randomized Clinical Trial Setting: MMIPR, Mullana (Ambala)

Method: Thirty patients were randomly allocated to 2 different groups. The experimental group performed trunk balance exercises in addition to conventional physiotherapy. The control group get only conventional physiotherapy. The primary outcome measures were numeric pain rating scale (NPRS), Roland and Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) and Modified Schober's test.

Results: A significant difference in scores on the NPRS (p = 0.002), RMDQ (p = .04) and trunk flexibility (p = 0.00) were found in favor of the experimental treatment. Trunk balance exercise group (Group A) showed a significant difference in outcome measures as compared to conventional group (Group B).

Conclusion: Statistically and clinically the results suggests that trunk balance exercises are more effective than conventional treatment in reducing pain and disability and increasing flexibility in specific low back pain patients.


Keywords


LBP, Lumbar Spine, Stabilization, NPRS, RMDQ